Framing shed walls, 2 nails per stud?

hi everyone, i'm in the process of framing the walls for my 10x15 shed. I have 2 questions.
i'm using a framing nail gun (3.5 in) I have a ton of galvanized nails left over from the foundation and I would like to use them. The galvanized I bought for the pressure treated wood, but they won't hurt the regular non treated pine studs of the walls - correct? my other question is, when fastening a stud to the top and bottom plates - do I use 1 nail or 2? I feel like one would allow the stud to spin in it's place. Thanks everyone!
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galavinized is fine for regular wood, however the new pressure treated is highly corrosive, will rot out galaVANIZED NAILS.
USE STANLESS ONLY FOR NEW PT.
use 2 nails .... for studs.
i prefer deck screws, far stronger and quiet going in
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hot dipped galvanized are fine for the new treated wood.
s
galavinized is fine for regular wood, however the new pressure treated is highly corrosive, will rot out galaVANIZED NAILS.
USE STANLESS ONLY FOR NEW PT.
use 2 nails .... for studs.
i prefer deck screws, far stronger and quiet going in
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On Nov 22, 10:17 am, "Steve Barker DLT"

Even spiffier, construction screws with Torx (star) drive put in with a Makita impact driver. For those who like maximum overkill.
Joe
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deck screws might not actually be stronger than nails. They are hardened and will often snap rather than bend as a nail will under stress. Try this: drive a deck screw into a piece of wood about 1/2 way. Then strike it from the side with a hammer. It will probably snap off cleanly at the wood. Do the same with a 16p nail and it will bend but not break. Of course a screw might not pull straight out as easily as nail, particularly if the nail is 'worried' in when installed (hit 10 times with the hammer rather the 2-3 times), but the strength of the joint has to be in all directions not just the opposite direction to the way the fastener was installed.

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When we build ramps, we use fasteners that are ACQ certified, whether using screws or nails. The nails are hot-dipped galvanized, NOT electro-galvanized (a very thin wash of coating that does not last long).
We tried the stainless screws but the shanks and square-drive slots would occasionally twist out and could not be driven further. We use volunteer labor, so that's a factor when driving the 3" screws whether stainless or otherwise. ---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
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Galvanized nails in this application are fine.
I assume, since this is a small shed, your going to construct the wall frames (at least some of them) laying down. Firing 2 nails per stud at the sil & 2 nails per stud at the top plate (16 commons or 16d "shorts"), is pretty much standard.
Studs that are installed when the "sill" is already set to the foundation (stem wall or slab) get three 8d toe nails at the sill & two 16's at the single top plate.
The second top plate is then nailled to the wall upon assembly (usually two 16's per stud bay)
but again this is a shed not a single family home.
In reality, how is the frame is nailed together is pretty inconsequential (with reason, no finish nails or brads), the real strength of the shed will come from the sheathing material....hopefully plywood or OSB
and how the corner connections are made.
The framing nails pretty much just hold the frame together until the skins go on.
Consider a decent exterior wrap material,it'll make the shed last longer and maybe even wall insulation depending on you local climate (might become a work room?)
cheers Bob
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Use 2 nails for 2x4 studs, and 3 nails for 2x6 studs.
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Thanks for everyone's input. It's much appreciated. Yes, I will be framing them laying on the foundation of the shed and raising them. So I think i'm good to go... Thanks again!
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You use 2 or 3 depending on the nail diameter. I suggest taking a look at a building code fastening schedule, if you google "fastening schedule" you should find something appropriate. 2006 UBC Table 2304.9.1 specifies for stud to sole plate:
endnail                    toenail (2) 16d common (3.5" x 0.162")        (4) 8d common (2.5" x 0.131") (3) 3" x 0.131" nails             (4) 3" x 0.131" nails (3) 3" 14 gage staples            (3) 3" 14 gage staples
Cheers, Wayne
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old PT had zero troubles with galavanized screws and evstud hangers for floor beams.
new PT attacks and dissolves regular steel and even galvanized screws etc.
one day you will wonder why your shed or deck is falling apart..
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