Foam vs Batt insulation when MOLD present

Due to (black) water contamination, and ensuing environmental conditions, my house developed an extensive problem of toxic mold growth. We finally gutted the place - tore out all the flooring, interior wall coverings, even the insulation - right down to the stud walls, to give the mold nothing else to grow on. It goes without saying that the house has had multiple professional applications of fungicides and mildewcides, etc., to kill the stuff. We have done everything possible, to kill the beast, and it seems to finally be gone. Now I need to install insulation before moving on to restoring walls, ceilings, etc. Money is a big consideration at this point, as I ran out of insurance ALE's almost a year ago, and have been paying for everything from my meagre savings. So, I am now very cost-conscious. The up-front cost of sprayed on, expanding foams such as Icynene are more than double that of fiberglass. However, the foam fills all gaps and cracks, and it claims to be mold inhibiting. Considering the battle I've had with mold, it might be worth the extra cost. Has anybody had actual experience with:
1) the insulating effectiveness of foam compared to fiberglass 2) the soundproofing effectiveness of foam (I've been told that increasing from 3 to 5 inches depth of foam between floors will greatly dampen sound, transmission. That is a BIG plus, as I have a "music" loving teenage boy whose band likes to practice at our house!) 3) whether foam really does inhibit the re-growth of mold 4) does today's foam insulation break down like the old stuff, or remain its integrity?
Thanks very much!
Liz
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I cannot answer that question but please make sure all windows and doors are properly flashed and if you have any masonry check www.bia.org to see how flashing is used there. Pella has some downloadable instructions to show how to flash their windows and doors and they are helpful even of you don't buy their stuff. Keeping water out of your house should be your first concern.
One point on foam. If it is a new product, I would not touch it. Let other people try it. Fiberglass works fine if you keep it dry.
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On 14 Jun 2006 17:39:49 -0700, "don't quote me, but......"

This is not a good time for cost-driven decision making. Foam is more expensive, but it's in almost all ways a better insulation. I suspect that it's mold-inhibiting properties have more to do with limited air and water movement and not giving the mold a place to start, rather than any real mildicide, but the treatment you already put in should be adequate, anyway, as long as you control the water in the future.
Exposed foam is a serious fire hazard though, so once you get it up, get the wall coverings on over it as soon as possible.
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Not really. The foam will have fame retardants in it. It will burn as long as something else supports the fire, but construction foams, by law, must be of the flame retardant type. The code does require it be covered though, but there is no reason to panic.
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wrote:

The problem isn't so much how well it burns (although even fire retardant foam burns a hell of a lot better than an equal volume of wood) but that it produced toxins that will incapacitate/kill you MUCH faster when it does burn.
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The first line you mentioned is the CAUSE of the mold problem, not the fiberglass itself. If you think that if your house gets flooded again, the foam will still be fine and happy.. you might be wrong. Drywall has a paper backing... Mold likes that too!
Anywho... if it were me, I would go with the fiberglass install. You need to look at the r value of the material itself. Most stuff these days is r-13 to r-15 for 3 1/2 walls.
I would wonder with foam install how you deal with the moisture barrier. You will still need one. Cold climates have it on the inside of the house right under the drywall while warm climate homes have it on the outside.
Tom
don't quote me, but...... wrote:

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