Fluorescent starter-switch question

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I have an older 18" fluorescent lamp that takes a 15WT8 bulb. As of this morning, it no marcha. I suspect the starter switch, which is your glass- tube type and is pretty black inside.
The problem is, I can't find any 15W starter switches at any location close to me. I can, however, cheaply and easily find a white, cylindrical starter switch that says, "13w, 30w, 40w" on it.
Can I use this "13w, 30w, 40w" switch with my 15w lamp?
--
Tegger

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wrote:

dead. And when you say "older" you should REALLY be saying OLD. It's been a couple of decades since a "starter" has been used on a flourescent lamp.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

What puzzled me is that specific wattages were indicated, rather than an upper-and-lower range of wattages. This suggested to me that there was some characteristic of the starter that rendered it functional--or safely functional--only at those specific wattages.
I am, as you may be able to tell, not an electronics expert. But I know enough to be able to keep from electrocuting myself, and from setting fire to my surroundings.
(I have now also asked my question in sci.electronics.repair, where I fully expect to be inflicted with 3rd-degree burns for having failed to ask an intelligent question. I invite you to amuse yourself by following my progress in that group...)

The fixture is a GE unit that's at /least/ 15-years-old and bears the "Order Code" number "UCF18P/CND".
This picture is what I'm identifying as a "starter": <
http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/misc/fluor-starter.jpg
The silver thing at rear appears to be a potted coil.
--
Tegger

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your giving WRONG information on availability and use of starters and YOU CANT EVEN SPELL FLUORESCENT ????

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On Fri, 6 Jan 2012 19:49:22 -0800, "Harrison Lighting and Neon"

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On 1/6/2012 9:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I have a desk lamp that predates the common use of starters. Instead it has a momentary on push button switch to turn it on. Some antique juke boxes I work on also have a starter switch for the fluorescent lights.
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I have a similar desk-lamp unit. It dates from the early-'70s. It has two buttons: one to turn the unit ON, and one to turn it OFF. Both are momentary switches, and you need to hold down the ON button until the unit lights up.
--
Tegger

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On 1/7/2012 5:09 PM, Tegger wrote:

I lost mine in a move and really miss it. It was great for working on detailed things where I need a lot of light. ^_^
TDD
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Any starter good for 13W will slao work fine at 15W

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Took you three tries to tell me that?
--
Tegger

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LMAO
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I do lighting as a business........35+ years........yes the starter you mentioned will work fine.
another poster says starters havent been used in decades..........they are full of crap.
Lowes, Home depot, pet stores (aquarium lights) still sell this type of fixture and these are in CURRENT PRODUCTION with fixtures of this type,
4watt t-5 6watt t-5 8watt t-5 14watt t-8 14watt t-12 15watt t-8 15watt t-12 20watt t-8 20watt t-12 various pl lamps use built in glass type starters anything with 2 pins. and rarely 30watt t-8 30watt t-12
all of the above up to the 20 watt are currently available as FRESH STOCK from any decent lighting supplier.
the 4' t-12 40 watt bi-pin and 5' F-90 t-17 have not been available since the mid 1970's except as special order replacements.
Herb Harrison owner Harrison Lighting & Neon
ps see http://www.answers.com/topic/fluorescent-lamp http://www.answers.com/topic/fluorescent-lamp-formats
----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: alt.home.repair Sent: Friday, January 06, 2012 4:29 PM Subject: Fluorescent starter-switch question

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Thank you.
Now, does it matter which leg of the cylindrical starter goes on which wire? I don't have the starter yet, so I don't know if there are designations for each pin.
--
Tegger

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If there were, I'd figure the pins would been different sizes. Cram, twist, light.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Thank you.
Now, does it matter which leg of the cylindrical starter goes on which wire? I don't have the starter yet, so I don't know if there are designations for each pin.
--
Tegger



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nope........on TWO pin starters direction dosent matter.............many years ago a 4 pin starter was available ( this would qualify as OLD ) anything you buy today that is close in wattage will work........at the very worst lamp will blink but not get damaged.

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I don't think it's the starter that's wrong. See my reply in the other thread.
--
Tegger

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I'm having a bit of trouble wrapping my head around this.
Do the ionized gases in the tube present less resistance to current-flow than the tiny air-gap formed as the starter contacts begin to re-open?
--
Tegger

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On 1/7/2012 5:28 PM, Tegger wrote:

The glass envelope of the starter is basically a neon lamp with a bi-metal short. When current first flows through the starter, the bi-metal strip heats up and pulls away from the other terminal and if current is flowing through a good florescent tube, there is enough current/voltage to light off the neon in the starter. The heat from the lit neon keeps the bi-metal strip hot enough to stay bent away from the other contact. When you hear a click, click, click along with the ends of a darkened florescent tube glowing on and off, it's usually because the tubes have worn out and no current is flowing through the lit tubes so the starter keeps heating up and cooling down as it tries to heat the filaments in the tube ends to ionize the gas in the tube and start the reaction that ionizes all the gas in the tube so it glows. The ionized gas is what conducts electricity to keep the neon gas in the starter lit. I hope this helps you understand how it works.
TDD
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