FloodSafe supply hoses - any experience?

I was thinking of replacing the supply hoses on my warshing machine with some of the Watts FloodSafe hoses.
As usual, I looked around the web to see how wonderful they were, but instead I came across a lot of people mentioning problems with the hoses, mostly along the lines of restricted flow rates (taking forever to do a load), and false tripping (requiring pulling the machine out to access the bib, removing, then reinstalling the hose).
Now I am not so sure that I want these. Maybe I'll just go with the stainless braided hoses instead.
What say you?
Jon
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On 12/09/10 11:29 am, Jon Danniken wrote:

We don't have them on the washing machine, but we have them on the dishwasher, the toilets and some sink faucets. Never a problem.
Perce
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"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:

I've got one on a toilet, and if I have the supply valve fully open it can false trip. With the supply valve closed just a little no false trips.
By their nature, they have to trip at a flow rate lower than that which you would get with the hose wide open. Since most appliances have plenty of flow restriction in their valves and whatnot, this normally isn't an issue.
I'll note that these hoses will not prevent a flood from a slower leak, such as a cracked plastic inlet valve fitting on a washer, a valve stuck partially open by a bit of debris, or similar leak that does not result in a high flow rate.
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Gee, did you figure that out all by yourself?

Tell us how you would put in a washing machine, the appliance in question, without using hoses.
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Uh, harry, you wrote the paragraph "they are just put in for ease of installation by the idle and the incompetent". It seems that you're the illiterate one; no surprises.
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On Dec 11, 12:13pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

far better to have auto solenoid valve on washing machine so it can only leak when someone is using it, that along with a good drip pan:)
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harry wrote:

I only watched half the video, but my primary reason for buying a hose with that shut-off valve is when I'm connecting water to something that has a plastic inlet connector, or otherwise to an appliance that has electrically-operated valves. The idea here is that plastic inlets and electrical valves can break or malfunction and cause a catastrophic leak (primarily disk washers and clothes washers).
Plumbing lines to fixtures such as wash basins, kitchen sinks, toilets, etc, don't really need this device. In those cases, failure of the up-stream valve would simply result in water going down the drain, not all over the floor.

Many older homes (built more than 10 or 20 years ago) would, I imagine, have solid copper lines running to all inside fixtures (sinks and toilets) so they wouldn't need a flex line for those things unless there was renovation going on.
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Jon Danniken wrote:

I used one on a recent toilet install - kept shutting the water off randomly, so I returned it to HD.
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On Dec 9, 11:29am, "Jon Danniken"

Most flooding is caused by small slow leaks that occur while you are away from home. These do i nothing to protect from those. Replace hoses and washers every few years they are cheap and its good insurance.
Jimmie
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On Dec 9, 11:29am, "Jon Danniken"

The stainless hoses are expensive and not that that much better than the cheaper ones. replace hoses and washers every 5 years and you are good to go.
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wrote:

They're not that expensive at all. Their purpose is to prevent catastrophic failure, not small leaks. Insurance companies like them.
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