Fire extinguisher gas.


What type of gas is used to pressurize fire extinguishers?
Anybody ever top-up an extingusher using say CO2. This would be a secondary (actually a third), back up domestic extingusher in addition to the up to date two we have permanently mounted in a) Our kitchen b) The workshop.
But we have an older one too good to throw away. Taking it in for formal recharge which includes pressure test etc. will cost more than buying a new, but of lesser quality, extinguisher. Which seems ironic!
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terry wrote:

What kind of fire extinguisher is it? Gas? Foam? Water? Carbon tet? (scratch the last, ISTR they don't use that anymore.) _____________

I would think so if it was a CO2 extinguisher.
--

dadiOH
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Oops sorry about that: It is a pressurized dry powder type B and C fires. Have also just realized that this one, because we have another larger one that had also lost it's pressure, has been discharged! There is no way this has 2.5 lbs of Ammonium Phospate based dry powder inside it! So this one must be tested and recharged or chucked out. Still has a bit of pressure though! It's a nice metal rugged one with good quality valve etc. Not one of those plastic handled thingies! However the question may still apply to another larger 'Dry Chemical' extinguisher. Agree haven't seen carbon tet for years. Smelt horrible, carcinogenic? Fellows used to take it out of those 'Hand pump Squirt type' extingushers to clean electrical stuff. Or the carbon-tet was in breakable glass globules in wall brackets!
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Carbon tetrachloride - great extinguisher, would work on most anything, except it would destroy the liver, and could extinguish the user.
wrote:

Oops sorry about that: It is a pressurized dry powder type B and C fires. Have also just realized that this one, because we have another larger one that had also lost it's pressure, has been discharged! There is no way this has 2.5 lbs of Ammonium Phospate based dry powder inside it! So this one must be tested and recharged or chucked out. Still has a bit of pressure though! It's a nice metal rugged one with good quality valve etc. Not one of those plastic handled thingies! However the question may still apply to another larger 'Dry Chemical' extinguisher. Agree haven't seen carbon tet for years. Smelt horrible, carcinogenic? Fellows used to take it out of those 'Hand pump Squirt type' extingushers to clean electrical stuff. Or the carbon-tet was in breakable glass globules in wall brackets!
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That is why it was taken off the market years ago for common use. It was also used as a dry cleaning fluid and at one time could be found in many homes.
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your refill place should tell you even though they are unlikely to repressurize one without a full recharge.
Don Young
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How do you know it's of lesser quality? It still puts out the fire doesn't it? Metal handle vs plastic? Metal handles bend, plastic ones can break. Both are poor quality if designed poorly, both are high quality if designed right.
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"Bob M." wrote

True. I still need to get 2 more refilled here but havent yet. The charge is still 'in the green' but just barely. This isnt so much 'leakage' as loss from testing them annually.
1 is in the kitchen (no, not over the stove like so many idiots do). 1 is in the hall where the 3 bedrooms come off of, 1 in the laundry room off the garage, and 1 is on the screened porch by the BBQ.
It the screened porch one that costs alot. Has to be rated for exterior climate. They are all small CO2 ones except the BBQ unit, I just have them refilled til they fail pressure tests.
Oh, you can in many places get them tested and refilled for free (CO2 types only) at the local fire-station. Costs nothing to call them and just ask. Here it's free but not everywhere.
For those not aware, you shouldnt have halon inside. It's toxic when it hits flames so unless you have some sort of OBA to wear when using it, not smart.
Having 4 home extinguishers might seem a little strange if you've never had a fire but Don and I have been in several shipboard ones (Navy) so we take care of our home safety well.
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Thanks for the idea of having one in/near bedroom area. Nobody here smokes but one never knows; an electrical outlet or extension cord etc. Seems like a good idea.
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"terry" wrote

It is. No need to run to the other end of the house, it's right there. It's also not just an ugly extinguisher hanging there.
It's in a little display with a cloth fireman doll leaning on it (atop a small thin bookcase). The fireman is slightly scorched and looking down in mild miff at the porcelin dog on the other side of the extinguisher who's apparently in the middle of lifting his leg on it, when he notes the fireman's expression. ;-)
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Different extinguishers use different refil procedures. We would need a lot more information.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Why would you need more info? The whole point of having a fire extinguisher is that it will work when and if you need it. Don't mess around. Take it to a lic. accredited testing and refilling station. Don't know where to find one! Ask a firey, go visit your local fire station.

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