Fire bowl on a wood deck

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wrote:

Actually, it is safer than the wood deck. Foam will melt and the fire bowl will drop to the ground. If it actually started to burn, it would put itself out one the wood passed through it.
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2011 07:32:32 -0600, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Just outlaw Democrats and we don't need these stupid laws.
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On 12/15/2011 4:34 PM, Michael Dobony wrote:

Oh come on, my statement had nothing to do with either party but I do tell folks that Republicans disgust me but Democrats are special, they horrify me. ^_^
TDD
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Get a square of the board that is used behind tiles (forget the name) Spray paint it Put it under the fire bowl It will act as an insulator
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Smitty Two wrote:

Make an 8 sided frame out of 1X2s 3,maybe 5 no make it 7 feet across, put filter cloth on the deck inside the frame, and fill it with sand. Duel purpose, cat's will love it.....
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On 12/10/2011 12:11 AM, Smitty Two wrote:

I haven't seen the question asked yet: how close to the house will the fire bowl be? Got vinyl siding? I'd ask the local FD about fire bowls on wood decks...probably some reliable info there. Allowing some heat penetration onto a painted surface probably brings other concerns.
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On Fri, 09 Dec 2011 21:11:59 -0800, Smitty Two

About 50 feet of air.
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Most of the insulation you get will come from spaces of air. I would prop up the board at least 4 inches away from deck, better with two two inch spaces, with final layer of stiff fiberglass on deck.
Greg
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On 12/9/2011 11:11 PM, Smitty Two wrote:

Has it got legs? I put a patio firepit on a small rolling flatbed. I fastened a couple of squares of wood decking to the flatbed, then fastened the legs of the patio firepit to the decking squares to keep it stable. The bowl of the firepit was about a foot above the deck squares, and the squares were about six inches off the ground. This worked fine for many years, and I could roll it into storage when I wasn't using it.
I currently use a firepit with taller legs and a much deeper bowl. The walls of the bowl are high enough that there is no blowing or dropping of embers from the fire, and it stands far enough off the ground that I don't worry about heat scorch.
I was driving past a two-story house with a deck one morning this past autumn and saw the deck in flames. It was a barbecue grill (charcoal, I suppose). A squad car pulled up in the driveway and the cop was grabbing the fire extinguisher from the trunk as I went by. I expect the owners had used their grill the night before and hadn't ensured that it was well and truly out.
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better to buy a natural gas or propane version thats designed to sit on a wood deck
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On Fri, 09 Dec 2011 21:11:59 -0800, Smitty Two

Go to your local metal working shop and have them weld you up a pan. Put some good casters on the bottom to move it around. Have them weld a fitting on the bottom for a hose bib. Make it about 6 inches larger in diameter than the bowl and about 6 inches deep.
Set you fire bowl in the metal pan. You may need to lengthen the legs so the bowl won't actually set in the water. Close the hose bib. Fill with water.
A friend of mine had this done and it worked great. After an entire evening of burning the water was hot, but the deck was still cool.
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I took a backer board and cut it round and the same diameter as the fire bo wl. I used the cuttings for feet to give me a very small bust stable and ef fective air gap to the deck. Just small squares every 6 inches and under th e fire bowl feet. It looks fine during the fire, I can easily move it aroun d the deck for different situations, and I can roll it on edge into the gar age for easy storage. Simple and effective.
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On 9/27/2015 9:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've seen a few Youtube of what happens when some one is careless with fire on a wood deck. It can be very expensive in a hurry. You didn't ask for any fire advice, I'll write a few words if asked.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 9/27/2015 9:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

IMO, you have to be nuts to have a solid fuel fire on a deck.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

What can we say? If accident happens I guess insurance won't bother to cover the damage. My deck is converted to 4 season sun room. Concrete patio has small wood stove.(no open flame)
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4 bricks or concrete blocks supporting a 1/4 inch thick aluminum plate that is at least 6 inches larger in every direction compared to the perimeter of the fire bowl.
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