Exposed nails on shingles

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The inspection of my new house reveiled some exposed nails on the shingles. How serious of a problem is this, and how far should I go with the contractor to fix it? Right now he is saying it is not a problem.
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"woods" wrote

Depends on how bad it is. Is the 'contractor' related to the seller in any way? If not, he means it's just the normal roofing nails and a few need to be tapped down probably.
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You might find exposed nails on a flashing or vent adapter, but a competent inspector wouldn't blink at that. It does have some earmarks of a less than expert roofing job. Get a second opinion from a non related roofer with a good reputation if you can. Good luck.
Joe
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woods wrote:

Give some details, photo if possible. Are the exposed nails only in certain locations or throughout the roof? What part of the shingle? What kind of shingle?
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wrote:

They are 30 yr. Cetainteed asphalt shingles. There are 17 exposed nails in the middle of the roof right below where the shingle above it ends.
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Someone did a hack repair on the roof. It might have been hacked to replace shingle(s) lost to wind or a falling limb, or it might be a poorly patched roof penetration. Check it out from the attic side to see what they were patching. It might have been an old vent location or some such.
R
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RicodJour wrote: ...

It's a _NEW_ house acceptance inspection apparently...
Sounds like the installer got in too big a hurry and got a few nailed too low.
Only 17 nails in a whole roof isn't much although strictly speaking of course there shouldn't be any.
They'll probably do worse trying to repair it than it will be to simply use a little roof cement over them and go on for that few if they're scattered around hither and yon.
If they're all in one area so could remove/replace a small contiguous area and get 'em all, then you might consider having them do so. Otherwise, the damage done trying to replace a single shingle here and there probably outweighs the likelihood of these ever being a real problem.
--
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dpb wrote:

Hi, You mean brand new house?
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Yes, it is a brand new house! This was the first thing my house inspector noted when he did his work.
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I read it the other way, but it is unclear whether it is a new new house or a new to the OP house.

I think the roofer was probably hammered.

It only takes one nail to cause a leak. The OP has a potential collander.

Well, that depends on the shingles. Three tabs are easy to pull and repair. Laminated are a bit tougher, but a competent roofer who had a slate ripper would have no problem either way.

I would tend to agree with the assessment. Pull the nails, neatly fill the nail holes with roofing cement (caulking gun), and press some shingle granules (enough will usually be found in the gutter) into the roofing cement to protect the roof caulk and make the holes disappear.
R
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17 nails in one shingle? Holy crap!
JK
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No, I mean there are 17 shingles with one exposed nail in each.
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That's a really curious arrangement. Are all of the nails on the same row and in a continuous run of shingles? I've seen nails run off course due to operator error, but usually they realize it as soon as they put a shingle in on the row above.
I'm now starting to wonder if there's a problem with the sheathing and they were trying to keep the problem from telegraphing through the shingles.
Have you investigated up in the attic? What did you see?
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Most likely a sloppy hired hand with a power nailer who didn't care about staying above the nailing line.
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wrote:

Yes, I talked to the young guy who was the roofing subcontractor, and he said "You can't do this without having a few exporsed nails since you only have a small line to put them in!" He was acting like he knew it all!
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I bet I know what his truck license plate reads: STOOPID
Remember, referrals work both ways. Give the idjit the appropriate referral when the subject of roofers comes up.
R
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Brand new house? If the builder won't replace each compromised shingle, I'd hire my own roofer to repair the damage, and deduct my roofer's charges. The builder should be amenable to having his own roofer make repairs however. I'd recommend removing each offending nail, and slipping an aluminum flashing card under the tab with the nail hole so water will run out onto the underlying shingle. Maybe lift a tab above the repair to drive a nail into the shingle through the flasher to keep it in place. Tom
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The guy who roofed my old house has agreed to try and replace each of the shingles with exposed nails, but he said he has to get it on the right day, or the shingles will want to tear when he tries to release them from their seal. They are really sealed down tight. He agreed that they will develop leaks sometime in the future if we didn't go up and tar them every other year or so.
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Not sure where you live, but if the roofer gets to the job on a cool morning, and uses a reasonably sharp flatbar, the shingles will separate pretty easily. Try not to rely on tar for the repair, because the guy's right, tar requires more maintenance than a fix without the goop would require. Tom
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I've heard of putting a dab of roofing tar on the exposed nailheads. To keep the nail from rusting. But, that's a heck of a lot of work.
--
Christopher A. Young
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