expected cost of a backup sump pump with installation

I'm looking at getting a backup sump pump of some sort for my home. We have an existing sump pump, but if the power goes out, we're screwed. Right now I stuck an APC computer backup plug on it, thinking that maybe I'll get a few extra pumps out of it if the power goes out, but I'm looking at getting a better long term solution.
I've read about the battery backups, and the water pressure based pumps, but either way it looks like I'll need some proffesional help to install these things.
Does anyone have a feel for how much it would run me to get this installation work done?
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Don't bother. Come late fall, just buy a bunch of flat-bottomed skiffs and put all your basment equipment and furniture in those...
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Bobby Boden wrote:

Check the power capacity of the APC and the power requirements of the Pump. Also look at the total run time at that power usage level (assuming the APC and power it at all) and you will see that you will not be able to pump very long.
Assuming the APC can handle the total watts (including the start of surge) of the pump, then you will need to decide if that will fit your needs. Maybe it can. If not then a larger battery system might be the answer. Figure out what volume of water of how long you are going to need the back up for and start shopping. A better alternative might be a back up generator.
The water powered pumps may work, but remember they don't like to pump much of a head (height) many have non-too large a capacity per hour as well. Of course if you are on a well, forget it.
Good Luck

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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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The water based pump I had (Zoeller) pumped 1:1; 1 gallon of city water 1 gallon of sump water. I pumped this to the storm sewar 75 feet away and it worked great. No batteries, no corrosion no limited life of batteries etc.

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Rich wrote:

I am not knocking them, but how high did it pump? 12 inches or 8 feet? above the sump and how many gallons per hour?

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Joseph E. Meehan

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The lift was 9 feet then the run was 75' so that run adds to the equation until it gets to the down hill part then it helps pull.

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Basepump at a 10 ft head on a 3/4 main with 75 lb pressure will pump 1000 gph 24 hrs a day till the cows come home. Thats 24000 gpd
Their battery powered unit and most others pump at a 9 ft head only 800 gph with one battery, probably not for more than a day. And that is with a new battery. In 7 years it may only pump 1 -4 hr Cost on install ? get bids, the way plumbers charge you would think they had a PHD. Install realy is not a big deal , the Basepump water pump goes in the same pit and on the ceiling
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m Ransley wrote:

Not many homes will have a 3/4 main with 75 lb, but over all I agree that these pumps can be a good choice in many cases. (I wonder if that 24,000 gpd includes the water used to power the pump? :-)
I really think that if my electrical power was less reliable than it is (it is very good) or if I had a problem with ground water (even in near flood conditions I could bail out the sump faster than it fills) I would put one of that type in. Who knows, maybe I will get bored some day and do it anyway.

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Joseph E. Meehan

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A 3/4 main is standard, 50 - 75 lb is standard , from what I have seen , at 50 lb it pumps 750 gph. . At 75 lb 1000 gph, this is water removed at a 10 ft head. I have 2 sumps, one for backup but I have sold myself on a water powered backup for the future. I can`t see the logic in a battery setup. There is the charging cost and the 6-10 yr replacement of the deep cycle marine battery needed . Full Capacity will only be reached the 1st year or so, and it`s short lived apx 24 hrs. Many water utilities such as mine have backup generators .
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I bought a new APC UPS and then a new car battery and wired the car battery in parallel with the internal UPS battery. Works great.
Pj
On 4 Aug 2004 13:18:44 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Bobby Boden) wrote:

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I tried it with a APC Smart-UPS 1000 and it overloaded with my 1/3hp sump pump. It works ok with a APC Smart-UPS 1400. Both of these are true sinewave ups'. I don't know how a motor would behave on a cheaper, "Stepped Simulated Sinewave" UPS thou.
(Bobby Boden) wrote:

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Have you checked to see how long it will run under that configuration? Efficiencies under that sort of configuration are going to be very low, to start with, not to mention the abuse of the battery.
If you want to run 120V equipment, you should be able to provide a 120V power source. If you want to use a 12V power source, well, it stands to reason that you should use 12V equipment. And if you're too cheap to buy a proper system, then, well, just ask yourself how much the jury-rigged one will REALLY cost when you have a basement full of water.
- Rich
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wrote:

I just tried it to see if it would work. Both Ups' are back on my PC and Home Entertainment System. The standby losses would run down the ups' batteries over time anyway. I'm looking at one of those Wayne Pumps 24vdc sump pumps for the main and backup use.
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Running a pump with a UPS not designed for 4x- 6x the load or more will be short lived for the ups. Surge start load can be up to 9x run for an old worn pump. Now figure stand by charger cost on a ups or battery system, for a battery float system charger it will be 20 $ a year minimum. Ups probably double that. A water powered pump will cost Zero, and outpump a battery system. Loose power for more than 24hrs or forget to spend 70$ for a 7 yr old battery replacement and you flood.
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On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 19:02:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Sorry, but all your figures are pure bull-shit.
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Pjx , The only bullshit is your response. So prove it, jack off.
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Pjx ,, you are full of shit ... Rebutt my statement if you dare !
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PJx wrote:

well that was meaningful.
A pump can (and will) use up to FIVE TIMES the rated running power draw of the pump at startup (I have a neighbor with a 2500k generator that's failing to start his pump that draws around 12A as it runs. He's looking for alternatives to putting in a 6000k generator (since he only needs 50A for about 20 seconds).
Costing out a solar system with and without batteries. Batteries use power. Once charged, the drop a little. Enough to measurably lower the efficiency of the system (and reduce rebate rates when grid tied).
"water powered pumps" I know nothing about.
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