Ever get ill after using a line-trimmer?

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NOrmal allergic reaction. This is the late phase response. If you are interested in all the gory details, I would suggest: http://microvet.arizona.edu/Courses/MIC419/Tutorials/allergy.html

Sneezing is a response by cells in the nasal passages to expel nasty stuff. If the nasty stuff is small enough, you won't get sneezing.
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If it's normal to experience an allergic reaction that lasts for more than a day, then I guess that's all it was. I've just never before experienced a exposure-reaction like that which came on so late and lasted for so long, other than that moldly house incident.
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When the garden work triggers my head allergy it usually starts a few hours after exposure to the dust/vegetation and lasts for a couple days after that.
The interesting thing is that otherwise, I have no allergies whatsoever. It's only when the garden dust is kicked up when I get these head cold symptoms. I guess all these microscopic pollen and creatures and whatever else I don't even want to imagine it could be, is entering my nose and my immune system is treating these things as foreign invaders. It makes sense because who knows what kind of nasty toxic things exist in that dust/vegetation cloud that I'm creating with the garden tools. I should probably wear a mask more often.
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ShadowTek wrote:

I get delayed symptoms something like that sometimes when I trim my hedge with hand tools and it's covered with pollen and sometimes when I crack and eat pecans from my yard.
I don't know if my occasional delayed reaction to pecans comes from microbes or a natural preservative within the nutshell. If I want to be safe, I rinse the shelled nuts and heat them in the microwave. They taste better that way, anyway.
One might think that if ever there was a plant one should not pulverize with a string trimmer, it's poison ivy. I've done it routinely for decades with never a rash. I have had severe poison-ivy rashes that had nothing to do with string trimming. I suppose string trimming is relatively safe because what it throws tends to stay low.
I suppose you got a dose of pollen. Cheap antihistamine pills might help.
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Actually, I seem to be immune to poison ivy, as I can rip that stuff out all day long with my bare hands and never be bothered by it.

I never have a problem whn trimming stuff that's low, I was just posting in reference to cutting through stuff that's at least at tall as you are.
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ShadowTek wrote:

Wouldn't the pulverization have been low? But it wouldn't take much shaking to release pollen at face level.
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I don't just cut things at the base, since the top part of the plant will then drop all at once and tangle up the line. I start from the top and work my way down.
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ShadowTek wrote:

Sounds like that is part of your problem. Might I suggest going retro, and getting yourself a scythe or sickle to keep up there, and doing the initial clearing by hand? Chop it low, and use a pitchfork and scoop shovel like giant salad tongs, to gather it up?
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I *did* have a machete with me on these recent trips, but with a blade that short, you have to do a lot of bending over to reach things.
I'm thinking about getting one of those brush blades next time I'm at HomeDepot.
I don't think they carry scythes.
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ShadowTek wrote:

I'm probably remembering the names wrong. Kinda like Death carries in all the cartoons, but with a curving handle to save your back. I've even seen them with arms sticking out of the handle, to catch the tall stuff as you cut it, so you can continue the swinging motion, and move it all behind you as you go. Like the things they used to have chain gangs use to clear weeds in road ditches.
I agree about machetes. They look cool in old movies, but in real life, after ten minutes, you are sore all over. (Unless that is what you do for a living every day, of course.)
A farm store may have better selection of tools like that than HD or Lowes. Leastways the handles will probably be longer.
(Googles). Didn't find scythes, but several places had the golf-club looking things I used as a kid, with the long razor-sharp blade sticking out. Handles are always absurdly short on those for some reason- only 40" or so. I suppose you could always fit a longer handle. Here is an example. http://www.tractorsupply.com/lawn-garden/lawn-tools-garden-tools/garden-hoes-mattocks/long-handled-grass-trimmer-4429395
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wrote:

http://www.tractorsupply.com/lawn-garden/lawn-tools-garden-tools/garden-hoes-mattocks/long-handled-grass-trimmer-4429395
Can I throw in a short rant here? I recently bought a grass trimmer very similar to the one in the photo you linked. Why the f**** do all the ones available now seem to have serrated blades? They don't cut very well when they're new (because of poor build quality) and you can't sharpen them! When I was a kid we had one with a regular blade, it cut well and when it didn't you could easily sharpen it.
I suppose with a grinder and enough time, you could modify it from a serrated to a regular blade...
Eric Law
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Eric wrote:

A serrated edge is supposed to work more efficiently on a grass whip. The standard method is to clamp the blade in a vise and file the bevel. I once tried that with a rusty one I found in a shed. It still wouldn't cut.
I've read that buyers of name-brand whips experience the same frustration because they come with lacquer on the edge. One buyer was very pleased with his whip after cleaning the edge with a 3/16" hone in a dremel tool.
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ShadowTek wrote:

I can't imagine having the line on a string trimmer tangle up. In waist-high grass, I'll make my first pass high because the mass of resilient vegetation down low would bog down a string trimmer.
I wouldn't attempt head-high stuff with string because I'd expect some weeds that tall to be tough enough to cause splitting in the .090 line I use.
For stuff that tall I have a disk with 3 replaceable nylon blades a little like propellers for model airplanes. They'll cut anything short of wood. Nothing bogs them down. The trimmer is more controllable than with string because cutting doesn't cause a pull. My clothes stay neater because they don't throw debris as much as string. Presumably they would throw less pollen into the air than would string.
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I'm wasn't really cutting "grass", more like large stalky weeds.

I saw those things in a catalog and wondered about their performance.
I guess I should get some and keep them for over-grown jobs like that.
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ShadowTek wrote:

Hi, Histamine is a result of your immune system not knowing what the allergen is(i.e. does not know how to take care of it). Maybe you have a genetic weakness in your bronchial passage. Knowing genetic weakness is very important for a person. I know mine.
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Now, please tell me how you KNOW that there is not a genetic weakness in your bronchial passage, or anywhere else for that matter. Or am I saying this to someone that "regulars" already know to be a nutcase?
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Michael B wrote:

Hi, Family history? Chronic problem? Always same part of your body bothers you? As far as I know we all have certain weakness. Have ever seen anything PERFECT in this world?
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Valley Fever symptoms take 1-4 weeks to appear, the OP had almost immediate symptoms.
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It's usually pretty humid around here in the summer, so it helps to keep the dust down, but last summer was very dry, and I noticed that mowing over patches of bare earth would often produce a large plume of dust. I *really* didn't like having to mow over areas littered with dried-out dog crap during such dry days.
In the West, I could easily imagine that it would be big concern.
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It could be allergies, toxic plants, fumes from the trimmer. I got sick enough to have to go to the emergency room a few years ago after trimming a lot of Azaleas I did not know the sap from them was poisonous.
Jimmie
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