European loophole for bulb ban

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At least the ones I have aren't "bulbs" at all. They're fixtures that plug directly into the outlet. The LED isn't replaceable (not socketed). They work very well but they do *not* "put out almost as much light as a 4 or 7 watt incandescent. There really isn't any reason for that much light, either.
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On 8/26/2012 6:15 PM, bob haller wrote:

Agree, I haven't bought incandescent household bulbs in years. "heybub" will milk this for years to come with his important announcements though...
We had some new offices and a conference room added and used LED lighting and I am really impressed how far they have come along.
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I agree. There are a few "sweet spots" for home use of LEDs already -- replacements for "can" downlights is one. Prices are coming down, they're dimmable and the quality of light is fine. Power per unit usually drops from 65 to 10 or 12 watts after changing.
Energy Police? Haven't seen any, haven't heard of any and even the paranoid bulb-worriers are coming up dry.
Tomsic
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On 8/27/2012 8:43 AM, Tomsic wrote:

I've recently installed power circuits for some of the Red Box DVD rental kiosks and the new units use 60 LED's now for the back-lit marque instead of 4 fluorescent tubes and the light looks the same to me. ^_^
TDD
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finger.net> wrote:

It's all silly. Those countries -including the U.S. and Canada - which phased or are phasing out standard incandescent bulbs have always had exceptions for rough service, decorative, appliance and other incandescent bulbs.
As I read the laws, incandescent bulbs will be around a lot longer than most of us particularly now that at least one company has introduced halogen bulbs that meet the new standards. The so called "2X" bulb puts out 1600 lumens, draws 50 watts (instead of 100) and is rated for 1500 hours life.
See: http://www.hybridlightbulb.com/FAQ-2Xversion.htm
Tomsic
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For most, but not for all. An incandescent lamp puts out light across the full spectrum. A CFL puts out 3 or 4 distinct bands of color (which you can easily see with a refracting lens). This difference may look okay to the eye at first, but try using a CFL to look at your face in the mirror. Instead of looking the picture of health you look ill and ghostly because CFLs are horrible on skin tones. CFLs are also poor for existing light photography.
A couple other things I don't like about CFLs is that they start up dim and then gradually brighten, making them a nuisance in a low-light or totally dark room. And then they tend to smell with an "electric smell" which is also annoying.
Lastly, when they burn out they do it with a flourish. Instead of a bright flash and a pop as incandescents do, a CFL usually smokes and gives off a bad smell when it burns out. The white base also becomes discolored with smoke. There is nothing wrong with the way these burn out -- they're designed to burn out exactly the way I said, but they're frightening to people unaccustomed to seeing them burn out.
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wrote

CFLs are lacking the deep red light wavelengths, so skin tones are affected. Complexions tend to have an orange or sallow appearance.
Tomsic
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A "rough service" bulb is typically a bulb with a filament designed for a higher voltage than its ultimate use, for instance 265 volts in Europe instead of 240, or 125 volts in the USA instead of 110 volts. This means that the filament burns dimmer and lasts far longer because it's not burning as hot. It also means that it gives off more heat and less light, and thus is less efficient as a lamp.
Another workaround that they're doing in Australia is selling incandescent bulbs as "heat lamps" instead of as lights.
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David Kaye wrote:

Years ago, groups were selling "10-Year" light bulbs, often to help some worthy cause ("Disabled Veterans of the Boar War"). Turns out the bulbs had filaments made from 10d nails or somesuch.
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wrote

You're thinking of "extended life" bulbs, not "rough service" bulbs. Rough service bulbs are designed to take physical shock and vibration so they have filaments that are mounted differently, extra filament supports and maybe even alloy filaments instead of pure tungsten. Some sign lamps are made that with rhenium/tungsten filament wire, for example. Such things cause the filament to burn a bit cooler and so the bulbs have extended life too.
Tomsic
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The standard voltage in the USA has not been 110 volts for more than 35 years.
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On 8/28/2012 7:10 PM, Daniel Prince wrote:

Industrial/commercial bulbs are rated 130 volts for standard 120 volt service. ^_^
TDD
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