Enamel spray paint in a can for wrought iron?


I primed wrought iron porch supports with oil but brush marks are very apparent. The supports have lots of filigree design set between iron tubes. Would enamel spray paint from a can, like rustoleum or krylon, provide a smoother finish and be as durable as a quality brushed on enamel?
Thanks.
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I used it on a gate back in the 80s. Haven't had to do anything to it since and it still looks great.
Harry K
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al wrote:

Krylon and Rustoleum have been around forever, but the Krylon anti- rust came years after Rustoleum. Performance might be a standoff, but I like Krylon for the nice finish on most projects and Rustoleum seems to take the weather beatinga little better. Flip a coin, I suppose!
Joe
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I'd probably go with the Rustoleum. However with primer with bush marks, the spray paint may not hide the brush marks.
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The biggest issue with spray cans is the type of nozzle they give you. The ones that are just a plastic knurled cylinder with a hole in it are crap. They may be OK for deoderant but not for painting. The blue ones with the visible wire in the slot in the back are a whole lot better (Ace hardware uses these). That shoots a fan spray instead of the spattering circle you get from the other one.
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al wrote:

Look at Hammerite paint. The hammered texture looks great on wrought iron and hides a multitude of sins. The texture also makes it less noticeable when you have to touch it up. And it comes in spray cans.
R
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The Hammerite sounded like a real good idea, but I contacted the manufacturer regarding use on oil primer and this was their response, just for anyone's information who may also consider using it:
"Since Hammerite Rust Cap is Xylene based and you have a solvent based primer on the surface, I recommend you topcoat with a water based primer first. The solvents in the Hammerite will lift off the oil based primer."
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al wrote:

There are small (8 oz?) spray kits you can fill with your own paint or primer. I have purchased them at Home Depot and at paint store. Glass jar and aerosol can that screws onto the jar. You need to thin the paint (Penetrol for oil-base) to spray it. It has a fairly narrow spray pattern, which was perfect for my project of painting louvered closet doors. They might get a little splattery when the air is about to run out. I kept a small foam brush handy, wrung out with mineral spirits, to catch the occasional run or drip before they set up. It worked very nicely, with better control than I have had with regular spray cans. When I first used them, you could buy the air refills separately, but didn't find them last time I used the outfit. Also painted the old kitchen range hood vent, using the sprayer with Rustoleum primer and enamel; turned out very nice. I think I used just a tad of mineral spirits to thin when I did the range hood, as my can of Penetrol had dried up :o)
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wrote:

Those are really for paint you can't find in a spray can like some custom mixed auto colors. I had to use them for interior paint on some cars I restored before I got a real touch up gun. If you have "air" a gun is the way to go.
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On Wed, 07 Mar 2007 12:32:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What do you use to thin auto paint?
I just got my car painted with a color not used by the automakers since 1979. And I got 5 oz. of spare paint. They call it "silver effect" where effect means something like metalllic. It will need thinning, won't it?
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wrote:

I would ask at the body shop that painted your car. Often touch up paint is applied with a small brush. If you needed to thin the paint to spray it, they would probably be happy to give you a little bit of thinner of the correct kind to do the job.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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I should have said that I don't have much air, and I might be using those after market spray bottles with the glass jar that you refer to in your first sentence below.
On Wed, 07 Mar 2007 12:32:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What do you use to thin auto paint?
I just got my car painted with a color not used by the automakers since 1979. And I got 5 oz. of spare paint. They call it "silver effect" where effect means something like metalllic. It will need thinning, won't it?
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Spraying with a rattle can is going to give you a smooth finish, but there are several disadvantages as I see it. First the proper use of a spray can is holding the nozzle about 10 to 12 inches from what you are painting. On wrought iron work this is going to mean that 90% of your paint is not going to end up on the railing.
Second, rattle cans are an expensive way to buy paint.
Third a sprayed on finish is a lot thinner paint film than a brushed on finish so it will not last as long.
I think I would use a brush, and if you were worried about brush strokes. add Penetrol to your paint.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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What were you planning to do about the brush strokes that are already there? It sounds as if you did not thin or use Penetrol in the primer. I assume you used an oil based primer, not some latex stuff.
Spray can work requires multiple coats just to cover. Most spray paint does not have the quality or longevity of "real" paint. You must thin enamel quite a bit to spray with your own spray gun. Penetrol allows brush work to flow out the brush marks. There is a product for latex enamel, I think it is called Flowtrol. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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DanG wrote:

Floetrol. Stupid name, good product.
R
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