Electronic Timer Won't Shut Down Amp

At least that's what it appears... In the old days these timers had a relay, but I know the new ones have no mechanical moving parts. The amp in question is "smart." When it receives an audio signal the LED on the on/off button changes from green to red. The amp is supposed to have power to it only for certain hours each day, controlled by this timer. But during the off cycle, the LED still glows red! I would expect it to be totally off when the timer so indicates. The bottom line is that I don't know if the amp is actually off. I seem to remember that one side of a connection is all some LED circuits need to operate, but don't know if this applies in this case. I'd appreciate your thoughts. Thanks. Frank
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Put a Killawatt meter or VOM and see how much power it uses when ON versus when it's supposed to be off. It's possible it does power down, but the red LED still indicates it has not been manually shut off.
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On 12/10/2011 08:55 AM, frank1492 wrote:

Solid-state relays pass a little current when off. I encountered this problem when using them to control my holiday lights. LEDs will light with such small currents. I got around that problem by having at least one non-LED item (like incandescent or motor) on each circuit. Maybe that would work for you too (put a small light on the timer with the amp). You could try to see if the amp works when it's supposed to be off (try it twice in case your timer has the annoying "local on" feature like X10).
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So, tell us a bit more. What is "amp"?
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I'm guessing the current it's passing lights the LED. Thanks for all your ideas. Will check with meter, also try the bulb idea. Is it still possible to buy an electronic timer with the old-style mechanical relay? Thank you all!
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if leakage is the problem, plug a small incandescent light into the timer along with the amp, that will provide a load for the leakage..
Mark
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wrote:

If the purpose is to save electricity, then that leakage will just go to the filament. I'd suggest buying a mechanical timer. I'm sure they are still made, or one can be gotten on ebay or at a second hand store or garage sale. Apparently the OP has a triac or SCR controlled switch, there must be some voltage still going thru this triac or SCR. Another option would be to feed the output of this timer into a relay, but for the cost and trouble, I'd just get a mechanical timer.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Hmmm, Is that a tube amp? leakage if present the current flow is negligible. Minimum load is required to make the SS timer work properly. I think something like 10W or so. Motion sensor in my back yard needs minimum 10W bulb to work properly. Another lamp fixture on light sensor works OK with 7W LED lamp. LCD TV, SS Amp, printer, etc. on stand-by takes about couple Watts.
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frank1492 wrote:

Some are. You can hear relay clicking when it is working.
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I did isolate the timer with a relay. That solved the problem. Thanks all for your many ideas! Frank
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Some of those electronic timers are never really all the way off. They require a path through whatever you are switching to make the electronics inside of them function.. Also if they see a reactive load some of them may not turn off at all, at timer that works fine with incandescent light for a load may not work using flourescent lamps. The solution to this is to either use a different timer or to isolate the timer from the load with a relay.
Jimmie
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