Electric wire within or "BEHIND" stud wall?

Hi, Finishing my basement. I have 2" foam insulation against concrete wall, with 2x3 stud wall immedia tely in front of that.
When I run electric wiring for outlets, am I obligated to drill through the studs (with 1.25" min cover from the front edge of the studs), or am I all owed to gouge out some insulation behind each stud and squeeze the cable be tween the insulation and the stud wall?
I want to do what's right.
Experienced advice appreciated. Sincerely, Theodore.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You trying to defeat the purpose of the insulation? A cow size wind can come thru pin holes..., LOL! I'd protect the wire and hole you drilled in the stud with metal strip piece made for the purpose.
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On Thu, 26 Nov 2015 15:20:30 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Must be either drilled through or stapled to. Drilled through will have to be within hald inch of the foam side or covered with a steel protection plate because you need to be 1 1/2 inches from the front surface.
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On 11/26/2015 4:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Are they *really* 2x3's? I.e., 1.5 x 2.5"

Drill the studs. If you've already framed the wall and getting a drill's chuck that close to the foam is problematic, consider using a plunge router from the front face of the stud to route a channel -- with a protective plate to cover up your sins.
If you haven't framed the wall, yet, consider drilling the *cut* studs before installation -- then just threading wire through them after erected.

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If you are certain that you are maintaining the 1.25" from the face, you could lay it in behind the insulation BUT you still might want the nail plates if you think you would ever hang anything there. That assumes you know where the studs are and don't just go fishing with the drill. Since you have the depth, sleeving the wire in EMT (conduit) might be the best way to go. Instead of just "gouging out" the insulation, cut out a slot 2" wide and cut a long plug you can seal it back up with when you are done
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On Thu, 26 Nov 2015 15:20:30 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Never mind ... brain fart.
Since the insulation is behind the studs, it is safely out of the way so just rock on. Punch it through behind the studs and go.
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 8:47:54 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

diately in front of that.

the studs (with 1.25" min cover from the front edge of the studs), or am I allowed to gouge out some insulation behind each stud and squeeze the cable between the insulation and the stud wall?

+1
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replying to millinghill , Brett wrote:

Hello Theodore, I am a licensed electrician in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.
Typically it is easier to run your wire overhead and come down to each electrical box. If you are using solid foam insulation, cut out a piece 1 inch wide from above, to the box. Turn that piece sideways and cut away enough foam to allow room for your non metallic sheathed cable (Romex). Run your wire down to the box and back up and over to the next box. National electric code requires a Romex staple over the wire typically within 8 inches from where it leaves the box, on the same stud that the box is mounted upon. Replace the foam over the wire. Now you can install gypsum board wall or the plastic interlocking panels used in basements.
Code requires arc fault protection for receptacles. If you have more than 3 receptacles an arc fault circuit breaker is more cost effective. Code requires ground fault protection on receptacles in an unfinished basement. A combination arc fault/ ground fault circuit breaker can be installed to cover your entire basement. Electric code is written by the national fire protection agency. It is a minimum standard for electrical installations to prevent fires or deaths. the suggested circuit breakers will comply with the code if sized correctly to the size of the wire you are using. American wire gauge # 12 for a 20 amp circuit breaker. I know this may have been too much information, but now you have enough to do a correct and safe installation.
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