Drywall repair

I have this small wall that has surface imperfections (not holes). Heard about something called "skim coating" where you mix water with drywall compound and apply it to the wall.
1) How thin should I make the compound before applying it ? Is it just water + compound? 2) Can I use a heavy-duty textured roller brush (loops) to apply this compound ? I have this one from Lowe's already: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdA895-000000159-LR638 (sorry if the link doesn't come out). I am ok with a "textured" effect - at least it will be consistent.
I've also seen something called "texture paint" which you apply over the drywall to also mask surface imperfections - is this a better or worse alternative to skim coating with joint compound?
Thanks.
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdA895-000000159-LR638
You didn't really go into detail as to what the surface imperfections are, so I can't say if a roller brush would help. But a skim coating is really just a thin joint compound intended to smooth out shallow depressions, dark patches on the drywall (hides them from showing through the paint) and such. Personally unless there was a ton of them, I'd spackle them. They make a tube version of spackle that you apply with a foam applicator tip - it does a pretty good job really. Painter's spackle is what I think they call it.
I have some imperfections on my walls, most of it is air pockets that have ruptured in the original joint compound. Sloppy work in my opinion, but its not like I can do better.
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Skim coating is the hardest drywall job there is and requires considerable skill. It consists of applying a thin, uniform coat of mud over the entire wall. Usually, only the seams and nail/screw holes are done. The idea is to make it all perfectly smooth, as close to plaster as possible.
If all you have are some areas with imperfections, I would focus on fixing those with joint compound. The texture paint is another option, but that isn't as easy as it sounds either and you have to be willing to live with a wall with the textured look. I'd go with a texture type wallpaper/covering before I resorted to texture paint.
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Scratches, very small dings, small scrapes from removing old wallpaper glue - all less than 1mm in depth. Many people would probably just prime and paint over it - but these surface imperfections really annoy me.
I originally thought using compound full-strength with a mud knife was probably a bit excessive for the job, considering I don't have any joint problems or holes or anything that would really require doing true repair.
I remember someone had mentioned he mixed water + joint compound (thinning it considerably), thought it was called "skim coating" and somehow lightly (roller? knife? sponge?) applied it to his walls, covering almost all surface imperfections - like a brand spankin' new wall.
Thanks.

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Jesh,stop making such a project out of this. Get a gallon bucket of joint compound and touch up the bad spots a couple of times then sand it with 180 grit sand paper. Yes us "pros" add a little water to our "mud" and mix it with a half inch drill and paddle to loosen it up and get the air bubbles out but for what you are doing it is not needed. The reason some thin it "considerably" is because of DEAD ARM...."labor free" as I've heard it called. I find I make more of a mess and it's a PITA to keep on your Hawk...LOL

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