Drywall problems???

Is there anything 'factual' yet about the so-called 'Chinese drywall' problem?
All we have seen so far are rather emotionally charged media allegations**; next week it will be something else ........ maybe cloth caps made with unhealthy dye, from Taiwan or something???? O canned fish with too much phosphorus or something?????
** e.g. Lou Dobbs ranting and perhaps repeating unfounded information.
But very little (nothing!) from UL or other regulatory/licensing/ standards/organisations. So it's hard to decide how much there is to the debate?
For example; has 'anybody' taken a piece of the suspected material and subjected it to even elementary tests for humidity/temperature etc.
One reason for asking is that in Canada we too have imported quite heavily from China. But no problems AFWeK with drywall?
It is quite obvious however that what we in North America, regard as 'normal standards' for performance, health, non-permissible food additives etc. are much higher than in many places elsewhere in the world.
In other words despite some very dishonest North American banking/ lending practices we still consider that when we buy something physical/edible "It should work, healthily and as expected". It shouldn't poison us and the wheels should not fall off!
But as we tend to buy everything dumbed down to a Wal Mart bottom- price (and therefore a Wal Mart bottom quality standard?) the price we pay may not cover or provide the quality we expect?
Gee; does that sound familiar; "You get what you pay for", does have familiar ring!
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terry wrote:

Interesting and googling I saw this:
http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/housing/2009-03-16-chinese-drywall-sulfur_N.htm
Makes sense that sulfides in the mined gypsum could be the problem. I saw them making drywall on the Science channel and all they do is grind the mined mineral without purification.
What surprises me is that the drywall would be imported because it is a cheap but heavy product and I would think shipping costs would eat up profit.
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Frank wrote: (snip)

It was imported because domestic manufacturers couldn't keep up with demand, not because it was less expensive.
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Mike Paulsen wrote:

Makes sense. I had heard the shipping argument about cement and even higher value carpeting.
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Frank wrote:

I'll wager it costs more to ship the drywall from San Diego to Reno than from China to San Diego.
Shipping from the Orient is about $600 for 40 FEU, that is, about 30 metric tons (33 tons), or about $18/ton.
I found rail charges to be about seven cents per ton mile. It's 560 miles between Reno and San Diego, so 560 x 0.07 = $39/ton.
I didn't compute the charges via UPS.
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Frank wrote:

wiring and Copper pipe inside the walls BLACK?
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can\'t make them THINK"
  Click to see the full signature.
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evodawg wrote:

The Sulfur in the drywall.
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HeyBub wrote:

I should have been more clear.
Drywall is Gypsum. Gypsum is Calcium sulfate that has been cooked to remove volatile compounds. It is mixed with fibers (paper or fiberglass) and other additives to reduce mold, fire retardants, and wax to minimize water absorption. Then the whole mess is formed into sheets, dried, and wrapped with paper.
That's the normal construction of drywall.
The Chinese stuff apparently contained contaminants such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide. These outgass observable amounts of hydrogen sulfide (the "rotten egg" smell) when exposed to higher temperatures or moisture.
The hydrogen sulfide, in turn, attacks copper, iron, silver and other metals causing corrosion.
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On Fri, 3 Apr 2009 12:34:40 -0700 (PDT), terry

When I first heard the news, I seriously asked myself who would buy a house that smells like rotten eggs or an everlasting fart? I'd probably take sulfur in drywall over formaldehyde headaches.
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