Drywall Patch Repair Problem

I have been trying out those Easy Back Drywall Clips for repairing some patches in a remodel I am doing. Problem is they only stock 1/2" in the stores so I have to improvise for 5/8". The problem is that when I go to screw the drywall to the clip and by the way I have had the same problem with screwing a cleat inside of a patch hole where there was no stud, the screw always breaks the paper. When screwing into fresh drywall, this never happens. What do I do? Is it a forgone conclusion that if it breaks the paper, I am going to have big problems? I have a couple of these behind a tile wall and wonder if I should rip the patches out (4x4" or so) and redo using another method. It seems tight but don't want the patch to pull away or anything.
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I wouldn't expect any problems.
Just pick off any tiny bits of paper sticking up around the screwhead and go ahead with the taping/compounding.
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"If you can smile when things are going wrong, you've thought of someone
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I would suggest using a couple of 1" x 2"s behind the whole in the wall. First cut them to be longer than the hole. Then take a wood screw and screw it into the middle of each one. The screws are used simply to hold onto. Now take some white wood glue and apply it to the face of the board on each end of the two boards. Insert the boards into the hole and pull on the screws, so that the boards are being glued to the backside of the inside of the wall, until the glue sets up enough to let go. Then when the glue dries, remove your screw handles then you can cut a piece of drywall big enough to fit in the hole and either screw it into the boards or glue it to the boards.
This method works very well for patching medium size holes. You can vary your board sizes for smaller or larger holes. Most important is to use a good strong glue.
Good luck!
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I guess I don't understand why you feel the need to GLUE the strips.
I would use the 1x2 but just attach them with screws through the "old" drywall. Cut the patch to size and drive screws through the patch into the wood strips. Apply compounds to the screw heads and the gap between the patch and the old stuff. You might considered using "patching plaster" rather than joint compound. Use several applications and remove "high spots" with your dry wall knife immediately after application. The goal is to reduce or eliminate the need for sanding.
If the "patch" is over pipes that you may have to access again in a few years, NOT using glue will at least give you a shot of just unscrewing the boards. (A magnet may locate the screw heads under the compound or patch.)
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The reason I gule and screw the backer strips is because that is the way I save Tommy Silva do it on an episode of Ask This Old house. It is also detailed to do it that way in the Home Depot Home Repair Manual.
I acutally did this repair without gluing and so far my patch has held up. I can't see why gluing would be bad. I did not do it because I had not seen the episode of ATOH or bother to read my copy of the Home Depot Manual. It you wait for the glue to dry, before screwing the drywall nails in, it helps keeping the strips in place.

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