Dryer heater elementstays on


I just replaced my thermal cutoff switch and thermostat. Now when I plug the dryer into the wall outlet my heater element comes on. What is cauing this to happen.
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 17:42:04 -0700, slick wrote:

it comes on even with the dryer off?
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yes, I don't have to push the power button
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 20:15:21 -0700, slick wrote:

Then either you installed it in the wrong place, or there is a broken switch somewhere. this should not happen without the door being closed and the motor running causing the cage to tumble.
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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, Sounds like the previous suggestions are by knowledgeable/skilled people.
Also if you are lucky there is often a circuit diagram on the back plate of the dryer this will help you analyze how and where is the fault that is causing the heater to be 'on' all the time; rather than when the timer has been set and the motor running.
A further suggestion; our very old Kenmore has an extra set of contacts inside the motor itself; the idea being that they do not close the heater circuit unless the motor is turning. In our case those contacts went 'open' and we had to replace them.
But if they had fused together (short circuited) the heater in our model would have been 'On' all the time!
These contacts are completely separate from the motor 'start' and running circuit itself.
Well done fixing it btw. Far too many appliances are dumped/scrapped for lack of reasonable repair.
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All dryers run the heat circuit through the motor. That way, it won't heat unless the motor is running. It is not common to have a motor- related heating problem. The most common reason to have an element that heats while the motor is not running is shorting to ground, as I previously mentioned.
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The most common reason for an element energizing while the machine is off is that the element wire is shorted to a nearby metal ground. Sometimes it is the element wire itself that has bent toward the ground, and other times it is a piece of debris that has gotten in there that connects the wire to ground. And if you want to know the most common item of debris that can do this, it would be the underwire of a bra. Anyhow, you'll need to get access to the element to check it out. In theory, you can just bend back the element wire, or remove the debris, but it is probably better to replace the element itself.
By the way, a grounded element would explain why you had to replace the thermal fuse. An experienced appliance tech always checks this one issue when replacing a thermal fuse.
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