drilling 2x4 - wood bit vs twist bit ?

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My son needs to drill some clearance holes thru some 2x4's - to hold some carriage bolts.
He said to bring over my wood bits... but I said the normal twist would do just fine for these 1/4" or so type bolts.
SO - thoughts on using twist vs wood bits for holes smaller than say 1/2" ?
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Just one man's opinion. I'd use twist bit for the 1/4 clear hole, and paddle bit, to counter sink for the head.
Plug in corded drills are usually far superior to cordless. Or so, I find.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My son needs to drill some clearance holes thru some 2x4's - to hold some carriage bolts.
He said to bring over my wood bits... but I said the normal twist would do just fine for these 1/4" or so type bolts.
SO - thoughts on using twist vs wood bits for holes smaller than say 1/2" ?
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On 7/25/2012 4:59 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

twist drills get my vote
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Paddle bits are usually used where the hole is larger than a drill chuck will hold a twist drill, or is deeper than the twist drill. Many drills the average home owner are only chucked for 3/8 of an inch. Then you have to go to necked down drills. Pricewise paddle bits are cheaper than the twist drills in large sizes. If you are using a drill motor with variatable speed, the larger the hole, the slower you should run the twist drill.
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Really? I run large bits as fast as possible, and very light feed pressure.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you are using a drill motor with variatable speed, the larger the hole, the slower you should run the twist drill.
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On 7/25/2012 3:06 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

yes. it becomes even more important when you're using diamond drills, or different kinds of metals.
http://store.curiousinventor.com/guides/drill_speed /
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for wood,brad-point bits are preferable; they drill straighter than bits meant for metal like the twist drill bits. for larger holes,Forstner bits,or hole saws. spade bits are cheap,but less than ideal.
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Jim Yanik
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Definitely best for wood. Harbor Freight has some really good sets , reasonable $$. Watch out for nails, though, resharpening is tricky.
Joe
Joe
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Paddle drills tend to leave more ragged holes, and I have found they tend to wander off-course more than regular twist drills. For the exact same hole size, I would definitely use a twist drill.
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On 7/25/2012 3:03 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

it would help if the OP used the correct terminology.
a wood bit is also a twist bit.
i believe the OP means to ask whether to use a twist bit or a spade bit.
the answer is whether the holes have to look good or not, and how exact the placement is.
if it's just a wide rough hole, then a spade bit is faster but can leave a ragged hole.
if the hole placement is more critical, then a twist bit is more accurate and will leave a cleaner hole, with less breakout on the backside.
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On 07/25/2012 03:09 PM, chaniarts wrote:

When someone says "a wood bit", my first thought is that they mean a Forstner bit. In OP's case, if it is to drill a clearance hole for a 1/4" shaft (meaning a 5/16" bit), I think a twist bit would be the best bet for the job.
Jon
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A brad-point bit is preferable,for 1/2" or less in wood. twist bits are for metal.
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Jim Yanik
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If you're making that distinction, I think you're comparing spade bits to metal twist bits. I'd probably use the metal bits for 1/4" holes.
But if I wanted to make lots of nice clean holes faster than those metal bits I'd use brad point twist bits.
Forstner bits might be even faster, but you're more likely to split out the back.
If there's any chance of hitting random hardware in those 2x4s then use the metal twist bits.
Jim
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I'd use brad point bits for small holes, under 3/8". 1/4" holes are well within the size for low cost bits (DeWalt is a good choice).
Auger bits for larger than 3/8", unless you can't get an auger bit in the size needed. Irwin makes some nasty auger bits. ;-)
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wrote:

Anyone with a half brain knows that a 22 Rifle will make a quarter inch hole faster than a drill, and bullets are cheaper than drill bits too since them damn drill bits always brake when the get almost done with making the hole.
Caution: Dont hold the 2x4 on your lap or get your old lady to hold it when you shoot the holes. And dont put the 2x4 against your car tire or on the hood either. Just put the 2x4 against your asshole neighbors windshield or that fancy snantchy stained glass window on his house, and fire away. If you dont have an asshole neighbor, use someone else's asshole neighbor's car or house.
Note: Buy one bullet for every hole you need. Buy two for each hole if you're a lousy shot. If you insist on using a drill, buy two drill bits for each hole. They will always brake when you're hole is 83.6% done.
One last thing. If your drill has a cord, be sure to pay the electric bill before drilling. The power company always turns off the power when you're half done drilling or sawing or sanding. That's why you should always have hand tools in your toolbox.
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ps56k wrote:

Apples/oranges. Use whatever you have that will make the hole.
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dadiOH
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For anything smaller than 1/2", you'll probably be limited to standard twist drill bits.
For 1/2" or larger holes in construction work, I prefer to use self feed auger bits. When you're drilling holes for plumbing or electrical, you're usually drilling in confined spaces at weird angles. Not to mention, you're often balancing on a ladder to drill the holes which limits the force you can apply. The self feed bits really help pull the drill through the wood.
In a pinch, the flat spade bits do a nice job for rough holes also.
If you need a clean hole, regardless of the bit type, drill through from one side just till the bit starts to poke through the opposite side. Then drill from the other side of the wood to complete the hole.
When you start getting up to the 2" and larger auger bits, you'll probably have to use a low speed, high torque, corded drill. Be sure to use the extra handle (if you have one), and brace it against something. Hitting a knot with a 2" auger bit at full speed can rip your arm off! :)
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
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ps56k wrote:

It will work, a paddle bit will leave a much cleaner hole though.
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On 7/27/2012 4:02 AM, G. Morgan wrote:

Don't forget to get a building permit.
If your house burns down and you have an illegal/unpermitted hole, the insurance company may deny your claim.
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wrote:

Nonsense.
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