Draining Hot Water Heaters

Page 3 of 4  
On 2/16/2016 7:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

No
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 6:06 PM, philo wrote:

OUr water is all ground sourced -- much "blended" from CAP. A home without a softener will have a crust around each faucet aerator in short order. It will be removed only by *breaking* the hardened deposits (you can't "scrub it off").
Our last water heater lasted ~20+ years without being regularly drained. By the time it failed, you could hear a large "boulder" thumping around inside (impairs efficiency).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/16/2016 06:09 PM, SeaNymph wrote:
[snip]

Some people have a water hardener in the kitchen. It's also called an icemaker.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hah wrote:

Speaking of a water heater our Kenmore 9 year warrantied one on it's 16th year quit this morning(massive leak). Tomorrow one is being intalled and I was given a choice between A.O. Smith or Bradford White NG burning 50 Gal. unit. One is better than the other? I am wondering.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 1:50:23 PM UTC-8, Tony Hwang wrote:

i currently have an A.O Smith,
and i think it works fine, just like a real water heater
marc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 7:06:58 PM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

I think "glass" is most likely "fiberglas." Can't imagine transporting a real glass tank without breaking it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Absolutely, at least for Sears and AOSmith.
I cut one of mine open and there was a layer like vinyl, about 1/4", clearish, a little whitish, translucent. I had to work to pry it away from metal shell and it bent, with much more effort, like a uninflated basketball. Eventually I got parts of it inside out, but even then, there wasn't a chance of its breaking or leaking .
Used a reciprocating saw to cut it open. I'm too cheap to replace worn blades and eventually there were no teeth, but it cut almost as fast as before. Cut it in about 5 or 10 pieces and threw it away with the trash.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 9:10 PM, TimR wrote:

No, it's real glass (fused to the metal tank).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 1:07:06 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

Huh, you may be right.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyIjwMdD1JY

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2016 6:22 AM, TimR wrote:

Now, imagine trying to remove -- for the purpose of repair -- something that screws *into* a hole MANUFACTURED in that "glass bowl"... without cracking the glass (which won't cause it to leak, in itself, but *will* eventually defeat the purpose of the glass (preventing corrosion of the supporting metal) and cause a premature failure.
The same is true of the temperature/pressure relief valve on the top of the tank (and the sacrificial anode which screws in from above).
I.e., the SUGGESTED maintenance activities all pose significant risk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 9:45:53 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

Did you look at the video? It's not a glass bowl. It's a glassy coating equivalent to a powder coat. Huge tanks are routinely assembled by bolting them together. Cracking the glass is not an issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 9:54:56 AM UTC-6, TimR wrote:

A "powder coat" would not equate with a 1600 deg. ceramic coating.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2016 8:54 AM, TimR wrote:

Is your water heater tank several thousand gallons? :>

Would you rather I'd said "glass lined, formed sheet metal"? :>

Sure it is! When you break the drain or TPR, you're going to wander down to HD/Lowes and probably end up buying a BRASS replacement part. Then, you're going to screw this into the existing hole -- making sure it's a good, tight fit.
This puts strains on the metal and the glass fused to it.
Note that the manufacturer has undoubtedly tweaked his "process" to economize on the amount of glass fused to the tank structure (both to save on material costs as well as energy costs). He's also tweaked the related components to save there as well as minimizing any losses that he might incur assembling the units!
You can bet your *ss that he hasn't factored the homeowner's (unskilled) actions into this, down the road. And, plumbing professionals would sooner recommend replacing the entire tank than fitting a new valve ("Mr Smith, I could replace the valve for $250 -- which might get a few more years out of this tank -- or, get you a whole new tank for $400")
I.e., there is no incentive for the manufacturer to make the unit "robust" and "repairable". They *know* the TPR will only be activated rarely -- and, the tank probably replaced when that happens. Likewise, they *know* you won't be regularly draining the tank so they also know you won't be replacing that crappy valve!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 11:24:56 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

Uh, have you ever put a wrench on a water heater fitting? Ever take the an ode out? Takes serious muscle. It doesn't distort the tank. Obviously th e fittings are designed to take a load.
My point about the bolted tank is you really have to snug a bolt down tight , holding a plate and several thousand gallons (biggest tank we have at wor k is 420,000 gallons). If the glass coating can tolerate that, a homeowner with an 8 inch crescent isn't even noise.
I still don't drain a tank because I'm wary of the valve not closing. But if I started with a new tank I wouldn't be afraid to put a decent valve on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

FWIW, the last time I bought a Sears water heater, I opened the box and the water inlet or outlet was at a small angle. and the top of the WH, the sheet metal, was dented. They must have put something heavy on box.
My ex-gf said to take it back, but that would all be on me. Dragging it up the stairs, having to drive 3 miles, wait around, 3 miles back. (I put it on the back of my LeBaron convertible, so that requires tying in on both going and coming.)
Anyhow, i hooked it up and it's been fine for 5 years now.
Of course it's Sears, which uses a sheet of vinyl and not actual glass.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Micky wrote:

I pass a tank with plastic drain valve. After not having hot water over night they just replaced one with Bradford White 50 Gal. one this morning. For some reason most of new tanks are tall ones now. Not many short ones around. Had to cut off copper pipes to accommodate new one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sears doesn't make their own water heaters. The last sears I installed was a white something-or-other with a sears sticker on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Feb 2016 20:39:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

These seem identical to the one by AOSmith that came with the house. FWIW I did mention that brand in an earlier post.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The one I installed in the neighbour's house about 15 years ago was Bradford White with the sears name. A few years earlier they were GSW. It all depends who responds to the supply tenders, with what feature list and cost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


wander down

Then,

it's

take the anode out? Takes serious muscle. It doesn't distort the tank. Obviously the fittings are designed to take a load.

down tight, holding a plate and several thousand gallons (biggest tank we have at work is 420,000 gallons). If the glass coating can tolerate that, a homeowner with an 8 inch crescent isn't even noise.

the

heavy

Dragging

back.

closing. But if I started with a new tank I wouldn't be afraid to put a decent valve on it.

Last water heater I bought was 3-4 years ago, one of Sears' brands from Orchard Supply Hardware, which was a subsidiary of Sears now closed. There was a problem starting it up. Because it was brand new, I didn't pay much attention and Sears sent a tech out. He order a new electrical assy (can't even remember what that was) and then came back and installed it all under warranty. Since then it has run perfectly. I check it from time to time, flame color, etc. and not problems so far knock on wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.