Drain Install

When attaching a drain fitting to a plastic shower base, should I use some kind of adhesive or are the 2 cork pieces provided for either side of the connection good enough?
Plumbers puddy? Calk?
Thanks, Brian
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Brian wrote:

I like clear (or white) silicone caulk. Apply just a thin film on both sides of the top gasket.
The base should be supported on a bed of cement to prevent it flexing which will soon break the seal at the drain. If possible, inserting a rubber "Mission" (Fernco) coupling in the drain line will provide a little "give" and allow a bit of flexing.
Jim
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If there is any chance of the base flexing one way to stop it is to use foam. Squirt under the base allowing it to expand out of the base. Cut and trim after it cures. MLD

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On 6 Jul 2004 08:49:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@vafb.com (Brian) wrote:

For goodness sake. Follow the instructions of the mfg exactly.
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from my experience, more often than not the 'more is more' theory backfires with plumbing. overtightning can cause leaks. introducing caulk or other substances to pressure fittings can cause leaks. its 2004 and they've pretty much got shower drains figured out so they dont leak. just do what the instructions say.
randy

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