Does the body feel a shock on a GFIC protected circuit?

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Most of that "stuff" per code should already be grounded, eg metal switch boxes, conduit, metal light fixtures, and the water heater that is in question.

And if you tie that new ground rod to say the metal electrical box or conduit, its
A - redundant B - A code violation

The whole point of GFIs is to catch all those other paths before they can harm a person or the horse. And it doesn't render the question moot as no matter how much metal "stuff" you ground there is always going to be other failure modes.
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On Sat, 28 Jan 2012 14:40:46 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

He could still be establishing an equipotential grounding grid and that is a ground rod on steroids.
For the purposes of this discussion, a GFCI protected circuit should be safe enough not to kill the horse. The question is how many times a horse would chew that conductor and get shocked before he figured out what was causing it and stop chewing the conductor.
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On Jan 28, 3:24 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I had an experience a a few years ago. I was working in a flooded area being pumped out by a LIttle Giant submersible pump. I was powering the pump via an extension cord plugged into a GFI outlet. While working in the same muddy mess that the pump was exposed to, at time a felt a bit of a tinge in my hands & arms. Not much but noticeable. I was fully soaked.
I did not diagnose it further but I did plug the cord from the GFI and the tingling went away. The GFI never tripped (I tested with the push button and it worked fine.
My guess was that I was more sensitive than the GFI.
cheers Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Yes, and it happened to me, twice, and each time it was fairly painful.
To prevent nuisance tripping, GFIs have a time delay that varies by the level of current leakage. The old UL standard 943 allowed 6 milliamps of current to flow for as long as about 6 seconds before the AC had to be disconnected, but the time shortened to 30 milliseconds at a current level of about 200 mA. That's a very, very dangerous current, and even a far lower 20 mA is bad enough to cause muscle paralysis and prevent a person from letting go. Apparently humans can feel electric current at just 0.5 - 1.0 mA. Do NOT try to get an idea of the sensation from an AC outlet, even with a 15,000 ohm resistor in series to limit the current to a safe level
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yes you or the horse will feel the current for the time before the GFI trips. If the current is high enough, it can be very painful.
yes along with using the GFI, you should ground the metal tub and any other large metal associated with electrical devices.
Mark
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wrote:

Most of my tanks these days are plastic (Rubbermade brand). The heaters themselves have a ground in the cord, but that's about the only way to ground a plastic tank.
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On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 10:09:47 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Ypu could always throw a sheet of stainless steel in the bottom with a good ground cable out to a ground rod.
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On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 16:43:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's a good point!!! However, as long as I have the GFIs and test them regularly, I think I'm safe, as well as the animals.
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