Does my UPS work?

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I have 2 UPSes, both used, and one was marked Working when I bought it for $7, and the other I might have gotten for free. I can't remember.
Batteries are not cheap of course. A couple webpages gave me the impression that some people just buy a new UPS instead of replacing the battery. That's not a sound plan financially, is it???? Surely a UPS should outlive several batteries, unless there's a lightning strike.
The second question is, I've read the instructions but still not sure if the second one works. The instructions are short and don't address my issue
APC XS 900 .
Does there have to be a load for the Online light to go on? It's off.
A 60 watt lightbulb is as good a load as any, right?
OTOH, the Building Wiring Fault light is on, probably because somewhere I lost the ground connection, but It's only plugged in for testing. Do I have to plug it in somewhere with a ground to get the Online light to go on?
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On 08/21/2015 07:09 AM, micky wrote:

Sometimes the switchover or charging circuitry fails. The last time I replaced my home UPS the battery was good but it wouldn't switch over. We have a lot of UPS's at work and the failure rate is fairly high. That goes for APC or no-name units.

Plug a radio into one of the protect outlets. Pull the plug on the UPS. Is the radio still functioning? The 60w bulb is also a good idea since that will allow you to see how long the battery will maintain the output. One failure mode I've seen several times is on switchover the UPS will effectively short the output crashing the computer while one just plugged into the wall survives the very brief flicker fine.
As far as the control connection to the computer, good luck. Find the appropriate software for the machine and your OS like PowerChute.
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In microsoft.public.windowsxp.general, on Fri, 21 Aug 2015 07:44:17

Hmmm. I've actually got a third one for my DVDR, and its battery is old and I've seen the power dip and if it's recording, it stops recording but stays on, and then starts recording again asap. I recorded 30 minutes of news and it ended up in 7 pieces!! OTOH, if it's not recording, it turns off and stays off.
**How could I have 7 power failures in 30 minutes. Well, I've got a "portable" air conditioner, and it's plugged into the same receptacle that the DVDR is. And every time it goes on, I hear a short beep. I thought it was the AC but finally realized it was the UPS. Still when I wasn't using the AC, and storms caused the power outage, it got through some that of those actual outages, not just dips, and lasting 2 or 3 seconds, without losing its list of programs to record.
But last night I had the feeling that if the UPS were not there, the dips in voltage would not have caused the recording mode to turn off.
So I just got back from buying a new battery. for this little one, and another for the one I paid $7 for and was marked Working. It was a few dollars more than mailorder, but I wanted the small one today, and I was able to compare the dimensions of the new one with the old one adn they matched. Some of the ones on the web had one dimension larger and anoher smaller. I guess the dimensions on the web were wrong, but I didn't want to buy mail order and find out that it didnt fit.

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On 8/21/2015 12:53 PM, micky wrote:

Many UPS's have a "sensitivity" setting. This allows them to react faster -- or slower -- to line disturbances.

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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 21 Aug 2015 13:00:07 -0700, Don Y

Thanks.
For the record, it was a bad idea to trim off the other newsgroups. I started this thread in XP and included this group because I thought you'd be interested. It's only by chance I noticed the thread is longer here, and if it hadn't been a lot longer, I would have missed all the replies that followed a post that had ng snipped.

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On 8/22/2015 12:25 AM, micky wrote:

I choose the newsgroups that I want my posts to appear in. If it ends up not being seen because you choose to read ONE of the multiple groups to which you've cross-posted, so be it. *I'm* not missing out on anything! :>
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 22 Aug 2015 00:45:07 -0700, Don Y

Well la-di-da. FTR, alt.home.repair was a group I cross posted to. XP was the group I posted to. I showed concern for you but you won't show the same for me.
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On 8/22/2015 1:20 AM, micky wrote:

I took the time to reply. The fact that you didn't take the time to chase down all replies that might originate in any of the different groups that you included in your post isn't my worry.
If you'd prefer I *not* reply to any of your requests for information, I can easily oblige...
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The UPS may be like some of the battery powered drills. You can buy a new drill with two batteries for what just one or two of the batteries cost.
I have not looked at the cost to make the batteries, but there must be a big mark up on them when they sell for over $ 50 each,but you can get two, a charger and new drill for the price of less than two seperate batteries.
Where I worked we had a lot of small motors (around 1/2 HP) that had a gear box on them. We could get the motor and gear box cheaper than just the motor.
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On 8/21/2015 8:50 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Most UPS replacement batteries are more or less standard. APC favors 12v 7.5amp for most of their low end residential/commercial UPS units.
They take either a single battery or a pair and I have no problem picking up batteries through various internet sites, Ebay or Amazon.com for WAY less than half the price of APC replacement batteries. I get ~3yrs service out of those "compatible" batteries. Who cares if they may not (and I have no evidence of this) last as long as a "genuine" APC replacement? Even if they last half as long, I'm still money ahead.
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On 8/21/2015 10:15 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I just replaced the batteries in one unit. If you buy the genuine battery from APC is comes with the wiring harness attached and you pull out the two batteries as a unit and slide the new one in. Cost is $110.
I found a place that sells replacements. I had to take the harness off (four spade connections) and put it on the new batteries. I also taped the two together to be a solid unit too. Cost was $37. plus half a penny for tape and five minutes to do the connections.
This is where I bought, but there are many other sources. www.batterysharks.com/
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 21 Aug 2015 10:43:21 -0400, Ed Pawlowski

Thanks Ed. I took a look, and bookmarked them, but
a) the guy at the store here was really nice to me a couple years ago. When I went to pay him I saw I had lost my wallet. Went back to where I had lunch, and paid for it, and owner told me they didn't have it.
Went back to battery store and he gave me one of the two I wanted on credit, never met him before. I only needed one at the moment.
Got money at the bank the next day and went back and paid him. Also stopped at the restaurant again and found out owner-wife had the wallet the previous day and went home without telling owner-husband. So I got my wallet back with everything in it. I'd dropped it on the floor under the table where I ate.
b) it wasn't that much more money
c) he let me try the battery in the UPS before I bought it. . I didn't know until this morning that even the one I paid $7 for and which said Working on it didn't do anything when plugged it, even with an all-but-dead battery . It doesn't have to have a load but it does have to have a decent battery, or even the Online light doesn't go on. I think the design stinks.
d) I wanted to get one of the batteries right away.
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On 8/21/2015 8:50 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Most UPS replacement batteries are more or less standard. APC favors 12v 7.5amp for most of their low end residential/commercial UPS units.
They take either a single battery or a pair and I have no problem picking up batteries through various internet sites, Ebay or Amazon.com for WAY less than half the price of APC replacement batteries. I get ~3yrs service out of those "compatible" batteries. Who cares if they may not (and I have no evidence of this) last as long as a "genuine" APC replacement? Even if they last half as long, I'm still money ahead.
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From the upsc command on my system ... battery.type: PbAc battery.voltage: 27.2 battery.voltage.nominal: 24.0 device.mfr: American Power Conversion device.model: Back-UPS XS 1300G
I have no idea what to look for, when it's time to replace the battery. Not sure where I put the manual, and am having trouble finding one online.
Regards, Dave Hodgins
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I presume that means lead-acid. (Most of this sort of thing use "SLA" - sealed lead-acid - which have a gel inside rather than liquid, which means the batteries can be used any way up.)

(Sounds healthy!) I'd guess two 12-volt ones.

Can you figure out how to open it? If so, have a look: the batteries are usually pretty obvious. They tend to be big grey (or occasionally black) blocks, usually with spade terminals; if you're lucky, they'll have a label on (or text moulded into the plastic), giving voltage and amp-hour rating; maybe also model number.

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It's either a single battery, or two in one case, so it looks like one.
Regards, Dave Hodgins
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On 8/22/2015 3:50 AM, David W. Hodgins wrote:

No, you'll find that it's two batteries, in series, which is APC's style. The two batteries will be joined by a piece of double-sided sticky tape and connected in series using a little jumper (sometimes with an inline fuse in the larger units.
As others have mentioned, just buy the appropriate replacement cells. I just "re-batteried" two such units and used some clear 1½" packaging tape to bind them together.
Piece of cake!
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On 8/21/2015 1:00 PM, David W. Hodgins wrote:

The larger capacity APC units (you have one) use TWO 12v batteries in series to obtain the 24V nominal.
Do a Google Search for APC Back-UPS XS 1300G manual (the G is for "Green", I believe) and you should find the manual you're looking for. I was just gifted yet another APC unit and didn't have the manual (it was an older model) and locating them on the APC site was difficult. Nothing would be returned with their search engine.
When I did the Google search I found one... Guess where? On the APC site. Go figure.
Also, look on the outside of your unit for a small (maybe 1"x3/8") white bar code label it will have something like BX1300 or XB1300 on it. That number means more than the model number emblazoned on the case of the UPS.
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 21 Aug 2015 21:31:45 -0500, Unquestionably

The manual, absolutely, but for replacement batteries, this won't work and the manual won't either. They give the batteries silly names like RBC2, RBC32, Replacement Battery Cartridge #32
For the battery give google the ups model number and use the words replacement battery. I didn't think of that. Google suggested it.

Hmmm. By accident I went straight to google. I guess that saved me some time.

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On 8/22/2015 2:46 AM, micky wrote:

[snip]

Yes, they certainly do give them silly names like RBC2 and RCB32. However, any battery supply house worthy of the name will have cross references to the batteries used in perhaps the widest selling brand of UPS devices.
APC and others with "proprietary" numbers count on some people being idiots and unable or unwilling to look past the end of their fingertip as the mouth the words in the owner's manuals. ;)
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