Does having multiple RJ45 jacks degrade the Internet signal a lot?

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I think others have already responded that every time you put a connection in a cable, you introduce one more place for problems to occur. Put that connection outside, where the cable enters the house and it's even more susceptable to problems.
Another secondary issue is each time you break the cable, make a splice or use another connector there is some signal loss. In this case, I think that's a minor point though.
Another issue I'd be concerned about is lightning protection. Since the antenna is outside, I'd make sure the mast is directly grounded and I'd also put some kind of surge protection on the wires entering the house. Exactly what kind is available off-the-shelf for this application I don't know.
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Most of the antennas out there that are installed on a metal pole in the ground probably rely on the above. If the pole goes 4 ft into reasonable soil that's probably good enough. If you want really sound protection then a real ground rod driven into the earth and connected to the mast would be additional safety. The one thing you don't want is a metal mast on say a roof that is not earthed at all.

Here's one example:
http://metrix.net/cat-5-lightning-arrestor-p-23.html
Google is your friend.
Also, looks like you may have found a reason to put a connection in the line where it enters the house.
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On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 17:22:10 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

If you put the POE adapter in the garage, you can have wired Ethernet in the garage without running a second cable, although it would require a switch to do so.
So the choices for wired Ethernet in the garage are: 1. POE adapter & switch in garage, single cable to the office/router 2. POE adapter anywhere, two cables between garage and office
Since you have a bunch of cable, the choice is probably #2...
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On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 13:40:36 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

Sorry I haven't responded sooner.
The whole setup was dead until just now.
I ended up with #2.
I put the POE adapter & the router in the central office.
This first ethernet setup of mine was harder than I originally envisioned (I had to wire it twice) but with all your help - it's finally working!
I'll post pictures separately.
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On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 05:29:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

UPDATE: Last night was a 'storm' (in California terms, which isn't much of a 'real' storm after all) ... but nonetheless, I heard a crashing shaking the roof and thought it was thunder. Turns out a roof tile fell down from one roofline to another! :)
In addition, the antenna, which is just stuck into the ground into an abs plastic 2"-to-3" bushing reducer, twisted a bit in the storm - so my reception dropped from -64dBm to -88dBm. Yuck.
I twisted it back into place (about a half inch of twist) but now I know I need to better secure the antenna base so it doesn't twist (we get

I watched the antenna in the wind & rain last night, and it didn't 'bend' the 2" thick water pipe at all. I don't think I need guy wires at all as it's pretty sturdy. The only problem is that it's a 2" pipe stuck three feet into a 3.5" hole!
Here's a picture this morning (in the early morning light) of the antenna. -

Notice the oak tree probably twisted it more so than the wind did: -

And, here's a picture of the 2" mast stuck three feet in a 3" hole with a 2"-to-3" abs plastic reducer at the top attempting to keep it from twisting in the wind. -

I'm surprised that flimsy bushing works at all given how heavy the mast is. So, the only engineering problem left is to prevent the mast from twisting in the wind from the wind or more likely the trees.
BTW, do you think this slight sidewise tilt of the planar antenna matters? -

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On Sat, 21 Jan 2012 16:23:00 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

Attach some kind of radial arm to the base of the pipe that is long enough to clear the concrete base. Unistrut and several hose clamps will suffice. Pound a spike into the ground at the end of the radial arm. How much good that will do against the force of the oak tree branches hitting the panel antenna is dubious. Having the pipe twist when the oak branches hit the antenna probably saved your antenna from destruction (as seems evident by the antenna tilt). If the pipe were secured in place, I'm fairly sure that the sheet metal mounting contrivance on the back of the panel antenna would now be twisted into a pretzel.
Incidentally, I would NOT pound a wooden wedge into the base bushing as it's like to split or deform the bushing.

Trim the trees.

Nope. It's fine (but ugly). The loss caused by polarization mismatch is fairly minor until you approach 90 degrees. Polarization Mismatch Loss in dB = 20 log (cos angle) For a 15 degree tilt, that's only 0.3dB. Even 45 degrees will only cause a 3dB drop.
<
Ummm... is that the Home Despot CAT5 on the ground? What happened to the waterproof direct burial CAT5? It will probably last through the winter, but all it takes is for you to walk on the cable, or some critter to chew on it, and water will get in. After that, it's just a matter of time before the copper corrodes into an intermittent.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2012 08:54:59 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff,
Thanks for the suggestions! You're a kind heart.
Since the antenna is 16 feet high, I need to research the cost/ versatility of having either a 20 foot (or so) orchard ladder versus a 20 foot (or so) chainsaw-on-a-pole for tree trimming overall.
I would think the home-repair guys would know which is best, from a cost/ utility standpoint since many of them probably have one or the other (or both). I can't afford both so I'll have to choose one of the two, always planning more for general use than for the specific one-time application.

Now that's very interesting! Yes, this tilt is minor, so, all it does, based on your calculation result, is look ugly! Thanks for the edification!

I made a big mistake when I first spec'd out this job.
I bought 500 feet of uv-outdoor cat5e from Home Depot for $75. Turns out I 'should' have bought about 100 feet of waterproof, and then another 100 feet of interior cat5e. That would have been cheaper, better, and easier!
If only I knew then what (you've taught me) I know now!
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2012 16:23:00 +0000, Chuck Banshee wrote:

I forgot to post the picture I took in the morning of the broken roof!

Now I have yet another repair item to learn how to fix!
:)
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2012 18:24:03 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

The trick is not to slip off the roof. Walking on tile is also a problem. You'll need some plywood or boards to distribute your mass. I've helped with a tile roof repair, but that was 30 years ago.
<http://www.practicalpressure.com/How_to_Repair_a_Tile_Roof.htm <
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgajyIO2sKA
<http://www.realtor.com/home-garden/do-it-yourself/roofing/repairing-clay-tile.aspx etc. Plenty more found with Google.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 06:41:34 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

With that distance, and setup, one piece to the center of the house would be my recommendation.
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Justin Time wrote the following:

My wireless experience. When I installed another computer in the basement, after already having a computer in each of our 3 bedrooms running off a wired router in the master bedroom (2 daughters with their own computer in their bedrooms), I elected to replace the wired router with a wireless router because the basement was 3 floors down and on the opposite side of the house from the master bedroom. This would have required running the cat cable up though the MB wall into the upper attic, then across the attic rafters to the other side of the upper attic, then down one floor into the lower attic, then down though that attic wall 2 floors into the basement. I didn't want to go though all that destruction. After the wireless router was hooked up, I had a lot of problems with the wireless signal in the basement, basically because the signal had to go though walls and floors some 60 feet away. I tried moving the wireless receiver all around the basement, including hanging it from the ceiling in various places, trying to find the best place to get a good signal. But wherever I put it, I would get a wavering signal, good one time then bad another, sometimes within minutes of moving it. Kinda like my cell phone signal in the basement which wavers from 1 bar to 4. I finally moved the receiver across the room to the opposite side of the basement without leaving my computer chair. Of course, the modem, being in several pieces now, didn't get any signal at all. :-) I then reluctantly went through the trouble of threading a cat5 cable through the house. The wireless router is still used because even though we lost 2 wired computers when the girls moved out, we have a wireless laptop in the kitchen for those times when you need the internet to look something up, or connecting to one of the social networking services (not me) without having to run up or down stairs. Besides, it can be used throughout the main floor, or hooked up to the LED HDTV.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote the following:

Sorry, I meant 'receiver'.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Hmmm, My house is small enough to cover with a wireless router. Desk top, Laptop PCs, a Macbook, wireless AIO printer and Home theater, Xbox, etc. scattered around the house. All of them play well. Router is Netgear WNDR3700V2 with OpenWrt firmware which even drives NAS box. Router is located in the loft located in the top floor.
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On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 00:41:58 -0800, miso wrote:

I think I'm confused too so that's why it's hard to help me.
Mainly I was worried whether I should BREAK the line at the entrance to the house (and put the POE there) or if I should keep the cat5 line continuous to the middle of the house (another 25 feet snaked about).
I was worried whether the break adds appreciable degradation?
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Your description is somewhat vague, but I can give you some general guidelines. Assuming you're running standard 802.11 ethernet, it makes some difference whether you're running 10Mb, 100Mb, or gigabit ethernet. Faster requires more care.
In general, you can have exactly one device at either end of the wire. You can have plugs and sockets in the wire, but only one device on either end....not in the middle...at the ends of the wire. You cannot tap a device into the middle of a wire. Devices have to be on the ENDs of the wires. Doesn't matter if the unused end of the wire is disconnected...the extra wire can't be there.
You can have two sockets and a jumper wire. Remove the jumper to use the connector in the middle of the run, but that disconnects the rest of your system.
If one of those devices is a router, you can use one router port to continue the run while you use another router port to "tap" the signal.
What do you mean by "terminate"? You don't "terminate" the line as in impedance matching. That's done inside the devices you connect to the END of the wire run. If, by "terminate" you mean, do I solder it or use screw terminals, that's a different issue. Should be instructions with the socket you use.
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On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 03:39:30 -0800, mike wrote:

That was what I was wondering.
I 'could' put a socket at the wall where the wire enters the house. I'd put the 15 volt Ubiquiti POE there (to shorten the length to the WISP antenna 75 feet outside).
Then, the jumper would go from the POE to the center of the house where the router sits.
That gives me the option of connecting a router either at the point where the wire enters the house 'or' in the middle of the house (but not both at the same time).
I 'am' confused - but I was mostly wondering if it badly degraded the signal to add that jumper as opposed to stringing the outdoor cat5 cable all the way to the center of the house unbroken.

May I reflect on that?
I think you're saying I can put the router itself at the point where the wire enters the house.
Then, from the four LAN ports of the router, I can continue the 25 feet to the center of the house.
From another of the four router ports, I can tap off to another portion of the house.
My question is if I do that - I would want to have permanent jacks in the wall.
So, I'd go from the antenna to the wall of the house where I'd put a jack. Then, I'd go to the router INPUT port with a short jumper cable. Then I'd go from one of the four router OUTPUT LAN ports back to the wall at another jack next to the first jack. Plus, I could go from another of the router output LAN ports to a third jack in the wall, which connects to another portion of the house.
This makes sense to me, and fits my needs.
But are these three jacks next to each other at the wall of the house a signal degradation issue?
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On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 06:53:20 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

I would not put jacks next to the router, myself. I'd just put plugs on the end of the cable and plug them directly into the router or switch.. Put jacks in the wall at the endpoint.
Connections that do not exist cannot cause problems in the future. Using a jack and jumper at the router adds 4 sets of connections to each run. That's 32 actual potential points of failure (of which 8 are critical on 10/100 without POE, which are totally un-needed.
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On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 13:37:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

True
But - wiring tends to have a much longer lifetime than the equipment hung on the end of it - not becuase it costs much, but because of the hassle and disruption of changing it.
So my preference and the way i have wired up the later runs at home after this hit me the 1st time is 1. run more sets of cables than you need - always seem to use more than i tohught i might need...... 2. terminate the fixed wiring on a panel or a wall jack.
That way when the "puppy attack" mentioned by Jeff happens, you just replace a damaged patch lead, rather than the entire run, buried in the walls.
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stephen snipped-for-privacy@xyzworld.com - replace xyz with ntl
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On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 22:33:25 +0000, Stephen

If and when the "puppy attack" happens you cut the damaged cable and install a jack. Always leave some extra cable in the wall or wherever so you have something to work with.
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On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 08:04:38 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

Cat5 is designed for 100m reach, within an office environment.
standard setup is 10m total of "patch" leads at each end, with a fixed "home run" cable between them.
Exactly what you use over the Cat5 dictates how sensitive the sugnals are to pushing the boundaries - but Cat5 is designed to have some room for long term degradation.
Various setups may increase the number of RJ-45 connectors - a power over Ethernet power injector within a run for example.

yes - but exactly how much depends on the device - find some cabling instructions on how to do it properly, but in general maintain the "twists" in each pair as much as feasible.
I think the punchdown style connections are easiest to do, and allow the twists to within a few mm of the connector.

Golden rule is treat this as flood wiring - put more cables in parallel than you think you will ever need, since cable is cheap and running wires in is disruptive.
Dont add extra jack points on an individual run unless you need to.
PoE is designed to work at 100m, so it doesnt sound like placement will matter much.

--
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stephen snipped-for-privacy@xyzworld.com - replace xyz with ntl
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