Does a capital ship sinking actually SUCK a swimmer down to drown?

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Dne 22/12/2015 v 02:56 Micky napsal(a):

But it could be because of your motion dynamics, as you inertially continue water under, until your buoyancy gradually reverted your velocity.
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wrote:

True. I'm no longer convinced. (Even though I doubt mythbusters on general principles). If one were right by the ship when it went quickly down, one would fall into the hole it left, but the water it pushed aside would be crashing back right after the ship passed also. How deep the person would go is a question.
I think if you were standing on the deck, whether the deck was horizontal or leaning, you could drop as fast as the ship did. Why not? Until there was enough water surrouding you for buoyancy to matter.
But if you were 3 inches from the ship, already floating in the water, would you fall over like in a waterfall? I think so, but like I say, you'd be competing with the water to see who and what dropped first.
One could experiement with little floating balls and big rocks dropped close to them, or better yet, held close to them at surface level and then released. A method for determining how deep they go would be needed.
Anyhow my point originally was no swirling. I coudl have kept silent on other stuff.
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On 22/12/2015 11:04 AM, M. Stradbury wrote:

Mythbusters tried it, and concluded that there was no significant sucking sown.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvU_dkKdZ0U

Sylvia.
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Sylvia Else wrote:

So when ship is abandoned, crews jump off the ship, they hang around the sinking ship, right? They always swim away from the ship as much as they can. Ask any sailors.
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On 22/12/2015 3:06 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

That's rather circular.
There is a wide spread belief that one can get sucked down, and there's no reason to think sailors have any better knowledge of this than anyone else - it's hardly something most will ever experience - consequently one would expect them to swim away.
Anyway, sucking people down is not the only possible hazard represented by a sinking ship.
Sylvia.
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Sylvia Else wrote:

Do you have any maritime experience? Worked on any kind of ocean going vessel(s)? Possess any knowledge gained from real life experience?
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On 22/12/2015 4:19 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Experience of ships? No. How would any of that help in deciding whether the vessel would suck me down if it sank?
Or do you think there's some sort of mechanism that allows enlightenment by osmosis?
Sylvia.
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Dne 22/12/2015 v 08:58 Sylvia Else napsal(a):

Nautical society has advantage of collective experience of huge number of people, surviving the ship sinking.
Even if I had been Nobel laureate for physics, sailors would know more about surviving on sea than me.
If personalizing, Sea has already laughed to many theoretical thoughts.
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On 22/12/2015 9:06 PM, Poutnik wrote:

For most things, perhaps. But how many sailors have experience of a sinking, much less such experience from the the immediate vicinity of the ship. Those who got sucked down, if any, won't be around to tell the tale. Those who didn't get sucked down, and survived, would be counter-examples.
Sylvia.
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Dne 22/12/2015 v 12:13 Sylvia Else napsal(a):

I do not say current sailors, but history of survival records and withnesses.
There are 2 other options.
Those surviving seeing others being sucked down, Those being sucked down not enough to die.
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Ever heard of WWI and WWII?
Lots of ships sunk and lots of detailed records.
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Jim Pennino

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wrote:

I was a sailor (blue water USCG) and there are lots of reasons to get away. For one, you really don't want to get caught in the oil slick. That is plenty of reason, right there. The oil can be on fire or catch fire. On a war ship, there might be some ordinance that will go off. If you are close you might also get snagged in the rigging. That will drag you down for sure.
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On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 at 1:17:55 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If I may ask, what did you do in the USCG?
I was a LORAN-C technician. One year at LORSTA Sylt, Germany and one year at LORSTA Port Clarence, AK. The remainder of my 4-year enlistment was spent as a LORAN instructor at the USCG Training Center on Governors Island, NY.
My total sea time consisted of a few thousand 7 minute ferry crossings between Governors Island and Manhattan. Countless times I missed the last (3 AM) ferry to the island and had to sleep in my car until the 6 AM crossing.
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On Monday, December 21, 2015 at 11:06:45 PM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

You are assuming that they have time to swim away from a rapidly sinking vessel, that they are not injured, that they are not helping a ship mate or a loved one, etc.
I'm not saying that they will get sucked down or that they won't, merely responding to your statement that they "always swim away from the ship as much as they can". That doesn't address the question as to whether they would get sucked down or not, it avoids the question all together.
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 14:51:47 +1100, Sylvia Else wrote:

Nice find! Will a Sinking Ship Suck You Down with It? | MythBusters
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvU_dkKdZ0U

Theory 1: Air mixes with water makes the water less dense, hence sucking you down. Theory 2: Cavities in ship causes water to rush into the ship, hence sucking you down. Theory 3: Ship falling down creates a vortex above it, hence sucking you down.
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Dne 22/12/2015 v 05:36 M. Stradbury napsal(a):

I have seen a video where a boat was in a lab sinked by this way,
in document about the Bermuda triangle, following the hypothesis about sudden huge gas release from the sea bad or underwater vulcanos.
Sinking a swimmer with density close to water is much easier than sinking a boat.
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wrote:

I knew a guy who drowned in club soda.
I think there was a lot of scotch, too.
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Dne 22/12/2015 v 04:51 Sylvia Else napsal(a):

in the first place rather for the effect, than to really investigate the nature of phenomena.
E.g. I watched their investigation of economic effect of frequent switching on/off the incandescent, fluorescent and LED lights.
They were over focused to refute the obvious nonsense the light at switching consume more power than saved by being off, and were successful there.
OTOH, experiment part about saving power versus shortening device life was very poorly designed and result had no statistical value.
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Dne 22/12/2015 v 04:51 Sylvia Else napsal(a):

But the did not make any attempt to maintain geometrical similarity.
IF a sailor size was 1/4 of a ship size, he would not be sucked either.
I am not sure, if the viscosity has to be scaled as well for that matter, but I guess it has.
As I mentioned in my other post the Mythbusters do not care much about reliability of their experiments and interpretations.
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mythbusters is a crock.
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