Does a capital ship sinking actually SUCK a swimmer down to drown?

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Is it true (or an urban myth) that a swimmer would be sucked under (presumably to drown) when a capital ship sinks?
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 00:04:23 -0000 (UTC), "M. Stradbury"

Myth
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M. Stradbury wrote:

Like toilet bowl water swirls.
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wrote:

I don't think the swirl is the part that matters. If you pour a half-bucket of water in a toilet, it will drain without swirling. It's the draining and emptying that matters.
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On 12/21/2015 07:51 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I think there was a TV show where a kid called a lot of people in places like Australia, to ask them which way the water swirls when they flush.
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2015 18:51:29 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

A toilet bowl is too small to show the Coriolis effect, but a pool isn't according to Sandlin and Muller.
http://mashable.com/2015/06/04/water-toilet-swirl/#vRjaqfm0bSqs "Derek Muller and Destin Sandlin, the minds behind the Veritasium and Smarter Every Day YouTube channels, respectively, do show that water (and even hurricanes or cycloness) preferentially spins counter-clockwise in the north and clockwise in the south, you just might not be able to see it with your toilet water."
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wrote:

Not surprising. Normally, quality home builders will put in a CW toilet and a CCW toilet because if they were both the same direction and both got flushed at once, it can damage the connection where the house sits on the foundation. If you buy a home already built, you should make sure your toilets are opposite each other, or you should be careful not to flush both at once.
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On 12/23/2015 3:08 AM, Micky wrote:

I have never heard anything like that in all my years (50 of them) of construction, nor have I heard it from the plumbers to whom I have talked. If flushing a toilet can damage "connections" we better start building things a lot better.
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Dne 23/12/2015 v 11:23 dvus napsal(a):

It rather looks like you became a joke victim. Due random turbulent effects, the result of the toilet splash is random as well.
What may be the issue is the design of plumbing wrt the capacity.
If all guests of multi floor hotel got diarrhea after eating "salmonellized" dinner...
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 00:04:23 -0000 (UTC), "M. Stradbury"

I would think so. I was in a 6-man rubber raft that went over a small falls and under water and though I wasn't tied to the raft, I went under water too. How much more so with a big ship.
Something about traveling and being on my own made me fearless however and I confidently waited, with my eyes open iirc, until I popped up again a few seconds later. Without the raft.
This was the Dranze River in France, just east of Geneva, Switzerland.
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Micky wrote:

Basic fluid mechanics. You know that the swirl direction of opposite of Southern hemisphere. CCW and CW. Rotating earth.
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On Monday, December 21, 2015 at 8:03:04 PM UTC-6, Tony Hwang wrote:

Hog wash about toilets...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihv4f7VMeJw

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bob_villain wrote:

Didn't take physics in H.S. or college? Wondering.
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wrote:

I certainly took enough physics classes to know the direction of the nozzles and shape of the bowl has more effect on the swirl than the weak Coriolis effect
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:46:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The notion that water behaves differently in northern and southern hemisphere basins is a nice little earner for smart operators living on the equator. In reality, the direction in which the water goes down the plughole is determined by several factors, such as the shape of the basin, and the way the water is moving before the plug is removed, etc. The position of the equator has no effect at all. There are manufacturers in equatorial countries who make basins in 3 shapes, one for north of the equator, one for south and one for right on the equator. The aforementioned smart operators buy these basins and set them up at appropriate places, and charge gullible tourists to watch the water going down the 3 plugholes in what they imagine to be a geographically-determined way.
Andrew Dickens, Bexhill-on-Sea UK
(The funniest explanation I've seen.) http://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-20326,00.html
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2015 22:18:50 -0500, Micky wrote:

A toilet bowl is too small to show the Coriolis effect, but a pool isn't according to Sandlin and Muller.
http://mashable.com/2015/06/04/water-toilet-swirl/#vRjaqfm0bSqs "Derek Muller and Destin Sandlin, the minds behind the Veritasium and Smarter Every Day YouTube channels, respectively, do show that water (and even hurricanes or cycloness) preferentially spins counter-clockwise in the north and clockwise in the south, you just might not be able to see it with your toilet water."
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wrote:

In panic, someone might not hold his breath, and even more likely, he might not take a big enough breath to be able to hold his breath for long, but I would think if one does get a big breath and doesn't panic, he should be able to hold it easily long enough to come to the surface again.
Does it depend on how fat he is how fast he surfaces? Probably. So if you anticipate being on a sinking ship, try to gain weight first. (When my brother was in Viet Nam during the war, my mother wanted him to gain weight to tide him over if he was taken prisoner. He didnt' go on patrol and he wasn't a flier, so the odds were very slim he would be taken prisoner, but other than that, I think she was right. )

So I've heard.
Hmm. This post is not in reply to my reply to you where I took issue with the importance of swirling. But I'll answer anyhow.
I'm not doubting that water in toilets swirls, or that water in eddies swirls. I'm saying that swirling water has nothing to do with sucking someone in behind a sinking ship.
In fact the water probably isn't swirling. The forces that make water swirl, in a bathtub for example, are weak compared to the tremendous amount of water that surrounds a large sinking ship. If the ship were not sinking, there would be no swirling, and I don't think sinking an inch every minute is enough to permit or cause swirling.
It's when the weight of the ship and the water it now contains is greater than the weight of the water the whole ship displaces that sinking quickly begins, and at that point there isn't time enough before the ship has totally sunk for substantial swirling to begin. Perhaps not any swirling at all. Note that it takes quite some time to have it begin even in a bathtub.
The stage of sinking slowly can take hours, but when sinking quickly begins, it takes no more than a minute, maybe two.
To beat this to death, I think the thousands of times people get to watch water go down a sink drain overhwhelms their lack of experience with sinking ships. However one can drop or throw rocks in a lake or a river pool, off a pier for example, and see that there is no swirling.
(One could even attach small balls that float to the rock, with some weak "adhesive" that fails when wet, and time how long it takes the balls to return the surface. Varying the depth of the water, or the release time of the "glue", one could measure three data points and extrapolate to a ship and a person, and a person with a life vest.
(Or maybe one doesn't need the rock for all of these experiements. While the water falling into the opening would slow down resurfacing, that water has filled in the hole within a measurable number of seconds, and the real question is, What is the acceleration of a human of given weight and size due to buoyancy, and how long would it take to stop downward travel and cause upward travel, and what would the total time be? All but the downward speed could be extrapolated just from measurements made by releasing floating balls from an underwater device.)
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Micky wrote:

m

Hey, couple months ago whale watching boat rolled and sank hit by a big wave West of Vancouver Island, few died and some survived. A couple survived is from Calgary here. They both said they got sucked under and then surfaced. My 2nd uncle is life time Navy man, Captain(ret), ROKN. He said same thing.
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wrote:

I heard abou tthat.

I didn't hear about that. Good to know. Should make OP happy to know too.
Just remember to pretend you're in the doctor's office, suck in a big breath and hold it.
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2015 23:59:04 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

Just one year. At Can Tho for about 4 months and Cu Chi for 8.
He's a doctor, and might have been drafted as an intern, but the army encouraged people like him to enlist and then they would let you finish your residency before you had to serve. That way the army got a specialist instead of a GP. My brother is a radiologist (but lately I've learned how much medicine he knows about other areas, which isnt' surprising since he went to med school, but even things which are new since school.) It was called the Berry Plan.
Then he did a year at Ft. Devins, near Boston.
My mother kept a map of Viet Nam and watched the news for stories about the areas where he was. I just waited.

Something to be proud of.

How did that happen.
My lottery number was 17, but I had two shoulders that repeatedly dislocated. They both got somewhat better after a summer's hard work, but then I got 2000 volts from a TV and dislocated one of them, fell back and dislocated the other. The first side came out 10 times that month and I finally had surgery. I can't sleep with my arm above my head anymore, but otherwise it's 36 years and doing fine.

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