Does a 1,000 gallon propane tank get special paint (any ideas on a pattern?)

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My 1,000 gallon propane white tank has been in need of a paint job ever since I bought the house fifteen years ago.
Two questions about painting a propane tank. 1) Does it take regular house (brush on) paint?
2. Any idea of a pattern that might be interesting? (cow markings perhaps?)
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 06:38:41 +0000 (UTC), Kat Rabun wrote:

NO!
You must use special propane tank paint.
Krylon spray ://www.krylon.com/products/propane_tank/ is 50 dollars for a case of six 12 ounce cans of propane tank spray paint. Each can covers 15 to 20 square feet.
I don't know how many square feet are on a 1,000 gallon propane tank though.
Van Sickle propane tank brush paint https://www.hardwareworld.com/Aluminium-Propane-Tank-Paint-1-Gallon-p38H1LI.aspx is 30 dollars a gallon.
I would guess a 1,000 gallon propane tank will take the whole case of Krylon sprays (6 cans) or something like three gallons of Van Sickle ($90).
You also need to prime before you paint and seal after you paint but I don't know what kinds of primer or sealers to use for outdoor propane tanks.
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i would call and ask the propane supplier, often the tank is owned by the supplier ask nice perhaps you can get a free re paint?
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 02:35:11 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've had verious suppliers over the years. None of them charge rent. They just charge $100 for the inspection upon the first fill, and then they don't charge me again.
Nice thing about propane trucks are they're loud, slow, and big enough to read the lettering on the side from afar. I called every company that drove by my house over the years. None will own up to being the owner of the tank. There was no paperwork whatsoever either.
Tank has a serial plate, but it only says who built the tank.
How do I get "free rent" when I'm not paying rent?
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Does-a-1-000-gallon-propane-tank-get-special-paint-any-idea-452502-.htm tcrankwa wrote:
Use a decent acrylic enamel. Don't paint over the rating plate - it has to be legible.
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http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Does-a-1-000-gallon-propane-tank-get-special-paint-any-idea-452502-.htm
At my cabin, the talented owner painted the hot water tank and propane tank with acrylics. It was mountain scenes, waterfalls, fish, squirrels. The tank was installed in 1986, the date she painted it on. We drain it every season, and it is still functioning. The outside propane tank gets buried in snow every year, and the pictures of squirrels, pine branches and pine cones are starting to fade. It was a very good paint job.
I imagine you could come up with some very nice things, maybe natural like that, or something out of the box funny.
Steve
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Steve B wrote the following:

I saw one painted like the Beatles' Yellow Submarine.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Or, the Oscar Meyer Wiener Mobile!
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You dont need special propane tank paint , there is alot better than Krylon , by many x better.
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 04:03:28 -0700 (PDT), ransley wrote:

Do I really need to put primer on first (over the existing paint), then the paint, and then a "sealer".
What sealer would you use? Is that the same as a varnish? Or laquer?
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There can be a substantial difference in the surface temp of the tank between where the fill level is. Unless you plan to repaint the tank frequently, you need to do everything you can to maximize the adhesion of the paint.
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On Jul 10, 8:13am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

You need to wash and clean it real well, is there any rust? That could be serious if its bad, the finish should be sanded if its glossy but you said 15 years so the gloss should be long gone. For my tanks I use a drill with wire brush to remove rust and prime with Rustoleum rusty metal primer, Over good old paint no primer is usualy necessary unless it is chalking, if chalking it needs special cleaning. Since you dont know paint, take a few photos of it to a real paint store like Sherwin Williams and let them direct you on how and what to do and what to use from start to finish. Without seeing a photo im just guessing, and any rust can ruin a tank fast. If it gets complete shade it can be any color otherwise white or only a very light color should be used, photos and pro advise by seeing them are best. A quart of paint may be all thats needed and rolling on a few coats can be 4 x as thick as spray cans. Alot of sprays like Krylon are heavily modified over the years to not produce air pollution so quality of product I dont trust to a commercial grade product in a can. All the water towers and bridges ive seen are sherwin williams paint , often a 2 part catylised epoxy, but even a good Oil house pant will do, and beat latex, latex breathes more than oil and doesnt protect as well from moisture and rust, rust is the main enemy of your tank. Cleaning and prep and the most important issue for a long life job, so take a photo and go to a real Paint store, not HD or Menards.
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 00:01:40 -0700, Orak Listalavostok
Why do they need special paint? Just curious.... I can understand not using latex house paint, but I'd think any oil based paint (like Rustoleum) would work.
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On Jul 23, 2:55am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

They dont, dont believe everything you read here. Rustoleum was the standard until epoxys and other high tech coatings came out, it probably used to have lead and was better but works today.
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On Jul 10, 2:38am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Don't use any dark colors. They make the tank hotter when the sun is out, therefore increasing the odds of the pop-off valve (safety valve) opening. White or silver are the most common because they reflect the suns rays and keep the tank cooler.
Hank
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Perhaps build a lean-to for shade?
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 03:10:19 -0700 (PDT), Hustlin' Hank wrote:

I know. My current propane supplier told me to paint it white or tan and that dark tanks are illegal in this state. http://www.propane101.com/propanetankcolor.htm
I wonder how many square feet are in a 1,000 gallon propane tank.
I found a cylinder surface area square foot calculator on the net but it's so complicated you need a degree just to use it. http://www.arachnoid.com/TankCalc /
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in message

Measure the circumference. Measure the height. Multiply. Measure the radius. Pi r2 x 2 Add them all. Close enough.
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On Jul 10, 9:15am, Kat Rabun <katspianostudio...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Square feet or Cubic feet? Square feet of the exposed tank sides and ends? Square feet of the portion that is liquid?
If you just want the square feet of what you are painting, just measure the circumference and then the length. Take the circumference x length. Then measure the diameter of the ends and then the calculation would be DxDx2 for the ends. Add the results together and you have the approx area to be painted.
Hank
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As to finding surface area. Just consider the tank to be a cylinder, don't factor on the curved ends.
The formula is pi x d x l, where d = diameter, and l = length. Add about 20% for correction factor, for the ends, and you're pretty close.
--
Christopher A. Young
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