Do you have to know the exact lavatory fixture you will be using before you rough in?


I am going to rough in a lavatory sink. I know it needs to be 32" wide and I set the PVC drain stub out right in the middle and about 17" above the floor slab.
Now I want to rough in the water supply lines hot and cold. Is it true that different types of sink may require different spacing and heights of the water supplies and I can't do the rough in until this is finalized?
Is it typically to rough in the water supplies above or below the stubout?
I will not be using a cabinet, so the plumbing will be exposed, probably it will be a vessel sink. Is there a standard on where I can set the supplies?
I am thinking I will set the hot supply 3" to the left of the drain, and the cold 3" to the right, and 1" above the drain. But I have not yet decided on the lav sink...actually, my wife has not decided, and even when she does, she may change her mind, and so I am preparing for the possible change, and how I can rough things in knowing things are not 100% set in stone.
Thanks,
MC
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counter mounted to the wall? You should be able to go to a manufacturer's site such as Kohler's and check out their rough-in specs for a few sinks to see if you are close. I looked at a couple, you have to drill on to get to where you can see the rough in specs. For example: http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/pdf/1093685_1.pdf
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A vessel sink will be sitting on a counter top or a cabinet, the bottom can still be exposed depending if it looks like a table or a closed cabinet. Some vessel sinks sits on top of the counter, some sit's half way down with the lower half below the counter top. Thanks!
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The rough in you suggested will work. Typical would be to have the waste 18 above floor with the water supplies 1 or 2" above the waste and about 2" to each side of the waste. Longer supply lines and longer tail pieces can make almost anything work. Cut the pipe holes fairly close in the drywall and make sure you use escutcheons to keep the inspector happy. Quarter turn angle stops would be typical, make sure you know what kind of supply lines you will be using.
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Since sink depths may vary you might want to err on the side of caution and have the drain rough in as low as practical. The water lines don't matter as much as you can always fudge a bit with longer supply lines.
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This is what I am thinking so I roughed in the drain at 17.5". Thanks,
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On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 20:35:26 -0500, "MiamiCuse"

I think it depends. I was installing a deep double laundry sink. My sink has a pull-out faucet so I made sure the supply line would not interfere with the pull-out line. Your thinking about 3" to left/right and of and above the drain is about right. Shoot for a mid-length supply lines, maybe 12", then you can buy shorter/longer when the sink is installed. If appearance is important wait for the sink to arrive before you stub out. Positioning the angle stops (before they are soldered in place) will help you obtain a smooth transition with the selected supply hose. With the shut-off valves at least partly hidden, all the better. Don't make the classic plumbing mistake by putting HOT on the right.
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wrote:

Thanks! I am going to use compression stop valve instead of soldered or threaded. I will have 1/2" copper pipes still out.
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