Do I need a permit/inspection for any electrical work?

Page 3 of 3  
Oren wrote:

Most insurance policies I've seen exclude deliberate criminal acts by the policy holder so the building would likely not be covered. A life insurance policy would likely be valid baring any exclusion period.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Building without a permit is not a criminal offense unless you are selling the service to a 3d party. I have never seen a policy that would keep you from collecting unless they could prove you intentionally committed arson. (like the guy in New York) I still wouldn't be surprised if his widow gets paid on the claim. I'm sure it will get reported either way. Making a mistake in handyman wiring has the same legal effect as plugging in defective christmas lights and setting the tree on fire. BTW getting a permit and having it inspected is no assurance that you didn't make a mistake. Inspectors take a quick look and go. Their workload prevents much more of a look. Around here they may start their day with 30 or 40 inspection cards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The NY case that was mentioned is what I was referring to. Likely homeowners insurance invalid and life insurance valid.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Caution. Most house insurance policies carry exclusions for the consequences of illegal acts. In Canada, violating the electrical code (for example) is an illegal act (provincial level). I assume that it is in some US jurisdictions as well (even if only a bylaw infraction).
In Canada, legal prosecutions for code infractions are _extremely_ rare, and usually only when the consequences were especially severe[+]. Still, insurance companies like avoiding payouts. If a fire is a consequence of unpermitted wiring modifications, you can damn betcha they have incentive to refuse to pay.
Will they? Depends. Do you feel lucky?
If they do, you have to sue. Which, on top of the consequences of a fire is going to be extremely costly. No insurance payout, an unuseable house, and trying to pay a lawyer at the same time.
Not fun.
Do I pull a permit for minor work? No. Because I know _my_ work won't cause problems, and the overall risk is extremely low. But certain things I do pull permits for - not because I can't DIY them (some I do), but because they're more major/critical, and the consequence of foulups is so high.
Furthermore, I make sure that permits are pulled for work that contractors do for me. The permits protect _me_ from shoddy workmanship, which is altogether too common - and a lot more obvious now that I've been watching Holmes on Homes ;-)
[+] Just recently, a local landlord (man and wife) were fined $12K for not providing smoke alarms. While there is a bit more legislation regarding fire alarms than "merely" the Ontario Building Code, the fact that five people died as a result of the fire demonstrates that the govt. is fully capable of enforcing the code thru the courts where "making an example" is necessary. The papers didn't say whether the insurance companies paid for the damage. I somehow doubt it.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.