Cutting Plexiglass ?


Hello,
Have a 1/16 thick piece of regular plexiglass (not a polycarbonate type)
To cut this stuff, will scoring it first and breaking over a sharp edge work ? If so, exactly how to do, please ?
How about with a table saw ?
Or,... ?
Thanks, Bob
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Table saw works well, as does a band-saw, mainly you want to stay away from things that reciprocate or vibrate.
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Eric in North TX wrote:

You need to control the speed carefully to avoid chipping. A small (1/4") router just doesn't work well. www.cyro.com has some good application notes, but they don't answer many of the critical questions.
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There are special blades made for cutting this stuff with a jig saw, table saw or bandsaw. Bandsaw is really the best way, with jig saw being second. The proper blade for a table saw is about $150. A dremel or roto-zip type tool with a 1/8" drill bit will also do the job. but is much harder to get a straight cut.
These folks are very good to deal with and they have always given me good advice:
http://www.modernplastics.com /
CWM
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2006 14:00:04 -0500, Robert11 wrote:

We cut a lot of plexiglass here in our store in Alaska-thousands of square feet per year-using the score and break method and also a circular blade paneling saw.
For 1/16", your scoring and breaking suggestion is the best. You can get a scoring tool at many hardware stores, but in a pinch, a utility knife will do. Make sure you score it several times.
Table saws with a fine-tooth blade work are good for 1/8 & 1/4 inch material, but probably not so good for 1/16 inch.
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On Sun, 3 Dec 2006 12:04:49 -0800, Karl S wrote:

People are making this too complicated. You don't need $150.00 saw blades. Use a jig or band saw if you want to cut curves. Otherwise, get one of these: http://doitbest.com/DoItBest/Main.aspx?PageIDd&SKU05663
Use a straight edge when scoring the plexiglass. Then put the plexiglass scored side up on the table with the sharp edge you mentioned.
Line up the score with the edge of the table. I'm sure you knew this, but I'm mentioning it for the other people.
Take a little hammer and tap along the score until it starts to crack. Then just push down to break the plexiglass all of the way.
If the plexiglass has protective paper or plastic on it's surface, leave it on until you are done.
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Robert11 wrote:

Check the Lucite fabrication guide here: http://www.lucitecp.com/literature.asp Hopefully will have what you need to know.
Frank
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Robert11 wrote:

Score and snap is the way to go for a newbie. Blade with a hooked caribide tip are the best and are found next to the tiles. Bandsaw is the way if you have a lot to do. I was involved in another post on this topic in which 33 people responded. Here is a link to it:
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/browse_frm/thread/a4ecde90286f475c/1147537b67e2b219?lnk=st&q=plexiglass&rnum=1&hl=en#1147537b67e2b219
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My son tells me that my RotoZip worked really well.
Robert11 wrote:

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Robert11 wrote:

Years ago I replaced motorcycle windshields several times by cutting trapezoids from rectangles of 1/8" plexiglass. I'd cut three sides, round the upper corners, and heat the piece in the oven for bending into a curve.
Each piece required several feet of cutting. A hacksaw blade gripped with a rag was accurate, safe for the material, and fairly fast. The material came with paper stuck to both sides. The paper prevented scratching and let me draw sawing lines. It may also have prevented chipping.
I might support 1/16" material on two boards with a gap for my saw.
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