Cutting Plastic Laminate

What's the best sabre saw model to use for cutting narrow strips about 2" in width from full 8 foot sheets of laminate?
Philly
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philly wrote:

A fine tooth run at a very slow speed with good backing under the laminate and a good straight edge.
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Joseph Meehan

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This is not a saber saw.
If you want lots of super accurate strips from sheets of plastic laminate, you need one of these:
Virutex slitter: http://www.247shopping-mall.com/universal-top-selling.asp?a 00071NUW&lstCategories
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in
I use my table saw with a fine blade
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Use a carbide tipped tool to scribe thru the color coat, then snap apart
or
Use a straight router bit
Are you using the strips for the edge of the countertop?
If so, you can trim the top edge with a router flush trim bit using the countertop as a guide
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Yes, the strips would be used as counter top edging.
Philly

2"
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philly wrote:

OK Martik got to the core of the matter. Follow his advice.Cutting the strips themselves should not require to much precision. You have had some good advice on that. I do suggest that a saber saw would not be the best tool as others have noted however.

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Joseph Meehan

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In alt.home.repair on Sat, 18 Dec 2004 14:03:26 GMT "philly"

I've never done this, and I have to do it this winter or spring, and I'm scaared of doing it, but in addition to what the others said regarding use of a saw, I've heard that it's good to put tape** on the line you wish to cut. That that helps keep it from cracking or chipping.
**What tape is best? 1 inch masking tape?
Meirman
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meirman wrote:

W/ a sharp fine tooth laminate blade on a saw inline and sawing so the teeth exit the back side it's not necessary but masking tape can be used if you wish. Simply cut slightly oversize and trim final w/ <sharp>, small diameter trim router bit. Go to the local salvage supply and get a sheet of scrap and practice before you start on your brand new full sheet. Some of the less expensive brands other than Formica tend to chip much worse. Beginners may best avoid them although as noted using smaller diameter cutters is basically the solution. Also your trim bits as well as your saw blades need to be very sharp for really good results...the cheap imports are definitely not a bargain here...
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posted:

You don't need any damn tape, just scribe thru the color and snap on a straightedge. It's very simple! Put the edges on first, align flush at the bottom edge and let the top edge overhang, then trim the top flush with a router trim bit. Test fit the top piece and file down any areas that do not fit flush. Irregularities on the surface will cause this. Don't forget to file all the bottom edges flush + slight bevel below drawers as they can easily chip. Email me if you want more details
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