Cutting down post-formed countertop


I need to cut a prefabbed 6 ft. post-formed laminate countertop with integral backsplash down to 5 ft.
What tool and techniques will result in least chipping of the laminate and give the straightest edge?
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 19:45:05 GMT, Al Tsiemers

I made an L shaped saw guide out of two pieces of 1x4 and clamped it to the bottom and back of the backsplash (opposite side from the laminate).
Then I used a portable circular saw with a 40 tooth carbide blade to first cut the backsplash (running the edge of the saw base against the guide) and then the main part.
I first cut it 1/8 oversize and then moved the guide and trimmed the 1/8. Came out nice and clean.
Cutting it a little oversize allows you to get the hang of it and also eliminates the pull of the big offcut when you are doing the final cut. Make sure you support the offcut on the first pass so its weight doesn't tear out a chunk at the end.
HTH,
Paul F.
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wrote: | | >I need to cut a prefabbed 6 ft. post-formed laminate countertop with | >integral backsplash down to 5 ft. | > | >What tool and techniques will result in least chipping of the laminate and | >give the straightest edge? | | I made an L shaped saw guide out of two pieces of 1x4 and clamped it | to the bottom and back of the backsplash (opposite side from the | laminate). | | Then I used a portable circular saw with a 40 tooth carbide blade to | first cut the backsplash (running the edge of the saw base against the | guide) and then the main part. | | I first cut it 1/8 oversize and then moved the guide and trimmed the | 1/8. Came out nice and clean. | | Cutting it a little oversize allows you to get the hang of it and also | eliminates the pull of the big offcut when you are doing the final | cut. Make sure you support the offcut on the first pass so its weight | doesn't tear out a chunk at the end. | | HTH, | | Paul F.
Great advice Paul I would only add to finish the edge with a belt sander (holding the sander vertical with the laminate top face up) |
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Al Tsiemers wrote:

Plan on finishing the cut with a router to get the smoothest edge.
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| Al Tsiemers wrote: | > I need to cut a prefabbed 6 ft. post-formed laminate countertop with | > integral backsplash down to 5 ft. | > | > What tool and techniques will result in least chipping of the | > laminate and give the straightest edge? | | Plan on finishing the cut with a router to get the smoothest edge.
dumb advice you can NOT get a router into the backsplash cove. obviously you have never done this before. sooooooooo...........shut the f-up.
I agree with Paul's advice that was good advice. | |
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Cabinets Galore wrote:

Umm...given that you are cutting with a circ saw from the back...why can't you use the router from the back as well?
Chris
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The problem with that is that neither the front lip, nor the integral backsplash are flat on the backside. A router would hang up trying to get over the lips. And to make things worse, they aren't going to be 90 degree cuts, front to back. It needs to be .25 narrower in back, so nothing will be cut square to the front edge.
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