Cutting a 4" diameter hole in wood

I need to install a dryer vent from my basement laundry room to the outside. The opening needs to be 4" round. I do not have a 4" hole saw and don't really want to buy one as I'll probably never use it again.
Is there another means to make the 4" hole for the vent? I have a jig saw and a multitude of hand saws/drills.
Thanks, Walter
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scribe the hole, drill a 1/2" hole inside it, and use that to start your jigsaw.
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outside.
It is almost a given that such vents have flanges around them to hide the actual hole which might therefore be quite ragged. If your intended vent has a flange then all you need to do is to drill a series of holes around the 4" diameter and saw away between them. This technique is especially useful for jobs like making 6" high-volume vent holes in brick and block walls -- just hammer-drill a series of 3/8" holes and then break out the center connecting the dots. All this isn't to say that you can't make the hole neater by making it smaller than needed and then using a wood rasp to enlarge it, just that neatness doesn't count as much as you might think..
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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Thanks for that suggestion. I'm going to try it.
Walter

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Home Depot sells 4" 4-1/4 and so on hole saw blades a bit expensive but well worth the time saved.
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Most jig saw rip fences have a small hole that lines up with the blade. Put a nail in there and adjust to create the 2" radius.
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outside.
Well..of course, we use a 4 1/8th inch hole saw for these, but you can do as others have suggested, by marking your hole, taking a drill and drilling a close series of holes around it, and taking your jig and playing connect the dots. I would NOT use expanding foam to seal it. use a min expanding foam, or if you get it close enough, silicone and then use your trim plates that should be with your vent.
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On 11/30/2004 10:27 AM US(ET), Walter Cohen took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

But do you have a RotoZip? That's one tool that has a myriad of future uses. Alternately, you can drill a pilot hole and then use the jigsaw to cut around the circle, or drill holes all around the circle and use the jigsaw between the holes. Use a 1/2 round file afterwards to smooth the hole if looks are important.
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The above is the way to go. When drilling the pilot hole, use your largest bit and drill where the edge of the pilot hole will be pretty close to the line you've drawn for the 4" hole. Then it will be easy to saw TO the line. Because most "pilot" holes are made in the MIDDLE, this smaller hole is more of an "entry" hole than a "pilot" hole, yet still within the circle. The precision obtained with a hole saw isn't necessary behind your dryer. Make sure you attach the vent hose firmly with hose clamps, at both ends.
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Personally, I'd use this as an excuse to reciprocating saw (Sawzall or the like).
However, if the toy budget is lacking, then simply trace the perimeter of the pipe you want to go out the hole, drill a starter whole somewhere along the perimeter, and then use the jigsaw to cut along the perimeter.
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 10:27:19 -0500, someone wrote:

As someone else said, the hole doesn't have to be very neat at all.
Don't know what the clearances and conditions are to get the jig saw in there. A large recip saw (borrow/rent would work. If you care more about $ than your time right now, the drill a series of holes and connect by hand saw method is long but possible.
How much is a holes saw blade that big?
-v.
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 17:21:09 GMT, someone wrote:

The 'hole saw' is the bit, and considered a consumable. Don't know that you could rent just the bit. The drill that drives it, sure, but doubtful on the bit that goes in it. Maybe. Guess he could ask.
-v.
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Our local rental shop has a whole rack of hole saws. Or is that a hole wrack of whole saws? Anyway, they are available to rent.
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<< The opening needs to be 4" round. I do not have a 4" hole saw and don't really want to buy one as I'll probably never use it again. >>
By the time you get some kind of crude opening hacked through the timber you'll really wish you'd used the hole saw. Be smart, buy a 4 1/8" hole saw and arbor. You can use it for cutting speaker holes in door cards, window openings in kiddy toys, etc. Milwaukee makes good ones, most box store brands will work fine. Prices aren't all that steep considering the time saved. Good luck.
Joe
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outside.
Others have some good advice, if a new tool is out of the question, the drill then jigsaw would be my approach.
Have a Harbor Freight nearby? - http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber6222 Bores through 1'' thick drywall, wood and plaster with ease. Includes cutting cup sizes 2-1/2'', 3'', 3-1/2'', 4'', and 5'', plus 3/8'' mandrel, 6.1 mm drill bit, drive plate, hex wrench, and blow mold case. Perfect for around home or on the job.
$2.99.........
Rick
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