Creature

What kind of creature is digging holes in my back lawn? There are about an inch and a half round and an inch or two deep. I have seen nothing out there. Nocturnal creature? If anyone can identify it and supply a remedy would be nice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Raccoons will dig for grubs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat wrote:

So will skunks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As will bears!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Da bearrrrrrrrrs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.break.com/usercontent/2008/1/Chicago-Bears-Super-Bowl-Shuffle-Rap-Song-443793.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Mutant zombies do that. Honestly a hungry animal, skunk, racoon, and its not worth the effort to worry about.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

add squirrels to the list ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote:

Maybe I should get some grubs and inject them with carbofuran and scatter them all over the lawn.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Van Chocstraw wrote:

Get a Hav-a-hart trap and bait with peanut butter. Have fun.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 09:59:16 -0400, Van Chocstraw

Skunks will do this when looking for grubs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote in wrote:

If they dig they are not looking for one, they found one. They can smell them from the surface. Although the holes are severely not desired, the skunk is really doing you a favor by minimizing damage. The grubs will destroy the grass ROOTS and eventually you will notice brown spots, patches or entire areas. This needs to be replanted. With the skunk hole you kind of kick the sod back in place and step on it. Rain will blend it back in and the grass will spread back over naturally.
To eliminate the skunk digging you have to eliminate the food. There are many of the grub control products out but the most effective is milky spore. Totally natural and harmless to all but grubs. Spreads itself. Lasts for a decade or more. Drawback is it takes a season to really start spreading after application.
I got it from a farm supply store. May seem expensive but it's one application only. Consider what's spent every year on grub control products that sometimes even work.
Get more detail info on extension servive websites.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And yet another chemical in the environment with unknown (and often untested) effects on humans! So that maybe 25 years from now etc. some 'Researcher' from a well known university or famous hospital will be reporting "XYZ percentage of families in the ABC area of city number ten, report that at least one member of their immediate family have symptoms of Alzheimer/ Parkinsons or other related neurological diseases possibly caused by previous use of agricultural/garden/cosmetic chemicals. This occurrence is ten times the average for the USA population as whole!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There is always the law of unintended consequences. However, that is where the cost-benefit analyses (plural) come in. But first, what are we talking about? See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_spore.
Analyses: 1. Milky spore is a bacterium that is specific for the grubs of one insect species (as far as is known). 2. It will only help if the grubs are from this insect. 3. Because of the host restriction, it will not affect other insects, or mammals, with very, very high likelihood.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Stan:
You're talking purely out of your ass. Absolutely no research or information before you mouth off about what you know nothing. Nothing does more damage to a cause than an uneducated and inexperienced promoter of it.
There is a lot of long term research on milky spore from many university extension services (which I mentioned). Milky spore has stood the test of time. The personal use I spoke of was in 1983. I don't know how long before that it's been around. Probably forever since milky spore is a naturally occurring host specific bacterium (ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_spore per Han's posted link).
The key here is "natural" which you both promote and slam at the same time. WTF? Maybe you think the bags Agent Orange shit from the Borg are better because it's in pretty bags from chemical companies and has some FDA listing. And, they have a wonderful freebie of creating a glow in the dark lawn.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stan had written:

Hi Red Green.
In this case I will have to defer to your obviously greater knowledge; of 'Milky Spores'. And will admit to never having heard of it.
But concern (about all domestic chemicals) comes from the habits of most of the North American population (including many who post here) who seem to have an attitude of 'See any kind of bug/weed. Go to the store, or agricultural supply house and ask the clerk for some kind of spray/chemical'.
Had a neighbour a short while ago readying to sell his house, spraying what looked like a whole gallon (4 litres) of some anti-dandelion stuff. Swearing all the time about another neighbour who wouldn't control their weeds. And on a patch of so-called lawn no bigger than 350 sq. feet.
That property is some 250 feet from our old well; fortunately we now have a municipal water supply. But where does all that unknown chemical go? Downstream/underground into aquifers, rivers etc. to perhaps eventually pollute oceans. In other words the well that was once our primary water supply is now (without extensive testing) probaly unsafe for consumption or even external use?
An extreme example being, IMO, that DDT which was the wonder insecticide of the 1940s and 1950s and now banned in many countries of the world, is now in the flesh of some Arctic animals used for food and also shows up in human brreast milk in some parts ofthe world.
So let's be careful.
My son has what he thinks may be carpenter ants, although uncommon here, and is going to be very careful about what or if he uses any chemical solutions.
He is 'No tree-hugger' as he refers some aspects of conservation/ ecology; but now he has his own home, but not yet any children he seems considerably more conscientious!
Thanks for the Milky Spore info.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I give ya credit Stan. Right or "less right" I would have jumped my shit back at me if I were you. Maybe I replied a "tad strong".
I'm no tree-hugger either and stand somewhere between that and defoliating everything.

Yep. Have seen it naturally living in VT with farms near rivers. Animal waste runs into the river, river dumps into Lake Champlain. They hint to give farmers an additional impact tax. Politicians/state officials tend to divert some of the money to pave roads...so cars can run on them...dump some oil, trans fluid, brake fluid, antifreeze, etc...to runoff into rivers and into Lake Champlain.
And on the unnatural side there was just a spot on the news about some of the most polluted beaches. Ever been in the parking lots of Jones Beach in NY? Can almost see the curvature of the Earth. All that crap leaking from cars ends up in the water eventually. The people who cause it end up on the short end because "contaminated water causes hundreds of thousands of cases yearly of skin rash, pink eye and gastrointestinal diseases, reports CBS News correspondent Kelly Wallace".
    ref: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/07/29/tech/main5195593.shtml .
The sea life takes a horrible beating.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<SNIP to this point>

The stuff leaking from cars leaks from them and makes its way to the ocean regardless of where they are parked.
The solution is not restricting parking or banning an increase of parking in locations that make this effect more visible by concentrating it into a visible small hotspot. The solution is any or any combination of:
1. Motivating people to do with fewer cars. 2. Motivating people to maintain their cars better and fix leaks. 3. Motivating car manufacturers to make less-leak-prone cars, or people to buy less-leaky ones. 4. Living with this should this actually be overblown.
Many of these get into opportunities for tax policy, which easily translate into opportunities for tax increases or new taxes that get blown on maintaining ability of governments to pay for their employees' health insurance premiums inflating (like everyone else's health insurance premiums) in cost at triple the "official inflation rate" (as measured by the official Consumer Price Index).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 09:59:16 -0400, Van Chocstraw

You didn't say where you were. Sounds like an armadillo.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or an anteater!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.