Cracked PVC 90 degree sweep below (toilet) closet flange

My toilet starting leaking into the kitchen below. When I popped the toilet, I first thought the problem was due to the fact that the slots in the closet flange itself were broken (and indeed the previous homeowner must have known this since he apparently tried to glue it and secure the toilet with a heavey dose of silicon caulk).
However, on closer inspection, I noticed that the 90 degree sweep below the closet flange had a crack maybe 1/8" wide going about halfway around the circumference.
Now replacing the closet flange and sweep below is not easy since I would have to either rip up the bathroom tile floor or the kitchen ceiling below to gain access.
Any suggestions on how to repair this in place? - Could I reliably seal the crack with plumber's 2-part epoxy putty or some other glue/caulk?
Regarding the broken slots in the closet flange itself, I purchased a stainless steel ring that supposedly goes over the slots and screws through the same holes that attach the closet flange to the floor. - Assuming that the closet flange is currently screwed into a wooden subfloor, what type of screws are recommended for securing the closet flange repair ring so as to get as strong and lasting a bite as possible?
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blueman wrote:

Possibly, but I wouldn't say "reliably" would be in the equation.
Assuming the kitchen ceiling is drywall, it's by far the best approach and not particularly difficult to repair. If it isn't textured, I'd say it's near trivial. Just cut the piece out neatly rather than just beating a hole w/ a hammer, etc., ...

If you have the elbow to replace/repair anyway, I'd suggest simply replacing the flange at the same time. If it has been broken this badly for some reason, who knows what else you'll find when you get in there? Why try to just cover it over to do it again???
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Replace the whole mess..As already said if the ceiling is drywall or plaster it is SIMPLE to repair..Unless you have that popcorn crap...LOL...They even sell small patch sized pieces of drywall and small buckets of joint compound at Home Depot for just such an occasion..Good Luck....
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blueman wrote:

Just cut the ceiling. It isn't a big deal. Use a drywall saw and saw a big enough section out to fix the problem then replace it with new, undamaged drywall.
I had a problem with a shower drain leaking down to the ceiling below, The only real solutions was to fix it right. The ceiling is likely already damaged it will have to be fixed anyway.
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