Corner Trim (Exterior) Raised Panels

I'd like to replace my standard flat corner trim on a 2-story colonial with slightly larger raised panel corner boards. Is there a formal name for these, and does anyone have a link to a website that shows what's available and how it was used?
TIA!
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captmike wrote:

It sounds to me like you are referring to corner trim boards that the siding boards butt into and are flush with.
How close am I?
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I think you're referring to quoining. http://www.archiclad.com.au/mouldings.html The style started with stone corners on masonry buildings and made the transition to wood when the classical revival thing was in full swing. In Italy you can find trompe l'oiel examples painted on the corners of stucco buildings.
Google quoining (and as a variant coining - some people have only heard the word and it does sound similar) and check out the images tab. You'll get lots of examples.
R
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You're close, but no cigar. I'm trying to define exterior corner trim used on clapboard siding. It might simply be called corner boards or something like that. I'll try to describe it physically.
Picture a two-story clapboard sided colonial. Usually, at each exterior corner, a flat piece of trim wood is nailed to sort of "cap" the corner, forming an "L" section to cover all the raw edges of the clapboard. Very often this trim is painted white as a contrast to the siding color. It's usually 3/4" board and its probably 6" to 10" wide depending on the design. The edges of the clapboards butt against the 3/4" sides of the "corner boards". It runs from the last clapboard on the foundation sides vertically up to the soffets. Now, in some instances, I've seen 10" wide "corner boards" that have recessed raised panels like a front door or column on a porch... but remember it's L-shaped/2-sided.
Coining trim is usually done in masonry with stacked blocks that stick out a little over the bricks. Some houses are showing wooden coining blocks. Same area, but a different look. I want something 18 feet long, L-shaped with each side being about 8" to 10" wide in the "L".
OK, come on back with the links!
On Thu, 7 Feb 2008 07:01:47 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

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1x material doesn't stand out far enough on its own to cover the complete end of the clapboards unless you're using small and thin clapboards. You'll probably need to shim behind the 1x or use 5/4.

That's not a standard, classical architectural detail and you're unlikely to find a lot of examples to compare searching the internet. It's more likely that you'd find examples in old architectural textbooks at a local university. I don't quite understand what you're trying to do with the L-shape, but the proportions are entirely a personal preference/taste thing. Draw it up to scale several different ways and pick the one you like the best.
An 8" or 10" raised panel corner might look pinched. An applied molding/panel could simulate the raised panel look and would be easier to make. You could also do something on the corner itself, such as this:
http://www.cmhpf.org/lytle25S.JPG
R
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