Copper repiping

My condo - ~1,000 sq. ft. - has the plastic piping (polybutylene), which was installed back when the 7-unit build was built (1985). I bought this place back in 2001, and have yet to have any problems.
Two units down, though, the neighbor has had chronic problems, and just recently a slow leak has caused extensive damage to the neighboring unit's wall and carpet, which is leading into a headache of a legal issue now.
In any event, I decided to get a bit proactive and look into repiping costs, and have had a high-end company come out and give an estimate. They sound real solid - good salesman came to do the estimate, in business over a decade, do nothing but repiping, lifetime guarantee on copper and labor, etc. I am just wanting to double-check to ensure that the cost is inline with what y'all would expect. (I am ignorant about most things home repair related.)
In any event, their breakdown was $3,860 for the repiping, $1,464 for the patching and $593 for texturizing/repainting, for a grand total of ~$6,000. (The patching and texturizing/repainting are optional, I can do those myself if I opt to, but I'd rather not. Although might it be cheaper to hire someone to come in just to do the patching/painting?)
Any comments on price, or recommendations on companies to use? I'm located in Southern California.
Thanks.
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Scott...
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Just a thought, but likely these utilities are part of the "common ownership" of the condominium assocation; the association is responsible for their maintenance and repair. Of course, in such a small condominium (7 units) things are likely to be a bit of "laizzez faire" (sp). But you might find yourself paying for your repairs now, then down the road the association hires someone to repipe the remaining units, with costs assessed to ALL owners, including you. Probably best to get everyone on board and do the entire building; likely get better price that way too. In any case, I suggest check the legal ramifications of doing this work.
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pat wrote:

Pat, thanks for the idea, but according to the HOA bylaws all maintenance and repair of plumbing that exclusively services an Owner's unit is the Owner's responsibility. There has been some talk about changing the bylaws, but I doubt anything will happen until this legal quagmire between the other owners w.r.t. the leak gets resolved...
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for CA sounds pretty good to me. I would be concerned with HOW LONG will it take. Since your in a condo it might be a good idea to check with the association to find out what you really pay for. If they are paying for insurance, specifically the damage insurance then you had better dot the i's and cross the t's before you bite into something that might hurt.
Do not forget to have them take the pressure regulator off the incoming line when you go for copper. The guy down the road may have screwed with his and that is why he is having problems.
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He said two to four days, and running kitchen and bathroom water every evening.

Could you elaborate? Are you saying in case the repipers screw something up?

Again, could you elaborate on why this is important? We would still have four units with plastic piping (three with copper) if I do the repipe. Also, one of the Owners is in the process of selling, and the building insepctor said the regulator needs replacing, as the psi coming into the units is in the 80s, and should be in the 60s.
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Scott wrote: <SNIP>

That's right; press reducing valve is required. In addition, water heater(s) should have an expansion tank. The combo will eliminate over-pressure problems.
Copper is nice, but install (even when using soft tubing) is difficult. Consider having PEX tubing pulled in place. At least get someone to quote it. Jim
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This is Turtle.
For California $6k don't sound bad.
Get the plastic out of your house.
Put Copper and forget about it.
Cover your Ass in unknown area like this and do it.
TURTLE
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