Concrete roof tiles repair question

After hurricane Wilma, some of the tiles on the roof are broken, shifted, cracked, lifted, and missing. I tried calling a few roofers no one is available to come by, the soonest one roofer told me was three months to just "take a look" to actually do repair work will be much longer. Some friends of mine told me a year wait is not unheard of. Even the insurance adjuster has not come by.
So this morning I went up to the roof, not an exciting trip but have to do to see what I needed to do. The roofers told me I need to not expose the tar paper under the tiles to the run too long, after severl months they will disintegrate. Along the ridge are many tiles lifted up. About 80% of them were just lifted and moved so I was able to salvage them and put them back. Now they are pretty heavy so unless we have a strong tropical storm or hurricane I think they will stay. But of course the cement that held them together is no longer working. So they are just sitting on their own weight. For the few that were cracked and missing, I laid down some 4 mil plastic sheets over the tar paper and used duct tape. That did not work, duct tape apparently did not adhere well to rough concrete surfaces. So instead I laid them on the ridge and tucked them under some existing tiles and it held in place.
Many of the other tiles are "shifted". So I lifted one to see. Underneath there are a blob of concrete cement, and under that the tar paper. So I moved the tiles back to their original positions. So my question is, what was the purpose of the concrete cement? Was it there as structural support to hold the tiles up? or was it an adhesive to glue the tiles to the tar paper? Since so many of these tiles are lifted and loose, and I moved them back, are the tiles still good or do they need to be removed, the concrete cement removed and new one applied? Now that I moved them back, the roof looks 80% better, so my other concern when the insurance adjuster comes, the damage will look less than it really is. Are the tiles that came loose OK to be just "sitting" on their own weight? Something tells me no. But many of them are loose now, I can tell because some of them the entire row of tiles "shifted" as areas that used to be covered are now exposed with a lighter color. It took me some time to use a mallet to tap each one back to it's original position.
Heard news the insurance for wind storm will go up 19% by Feb next year with another hike of 48% later in the year. Thank you Wilma!
MC
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Concrete at ridges helps keep out water, roof tiles are nailed, the ones ive seen, not caulked.
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I don't know if it is a regional variation or not. But the roof tiles I have are not nailed. They have nail holes at one end, but not used. I see that the tar paper (still seem to be in good shape after 10 years) underneath. Then the roof tiles are sort of "loose" sitting on top of several big blobs of concrete cement. I think it used to be not loose but Wilma knocked them loose?
MC
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Nail holes are for nails, caulk is for hacks. Regardless of age if that installer is around you have a good legal issue.
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The tiles keep the sun off of the actual waterproofer (resistor). You could probably live for a couple months with some tiles missing. Tom
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On Sun, 13 Nov 2005 21:00:36 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

They use screws in those holes around here. (SW Fla)
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Any missing tiles and you will leak through any holes in the paper, yes screws are best in high wind areas. Basicly its a total redo, caulk is never the right way. Tile roofs last hundreds of years, caulk is a joke.
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I don't think insurance will pay for a total redo. Most they will pay for is cost to replace the broken tiles. I don't know what to do with the shifted tiles either. They are now just sitting on my roof on their own weight not even the concrete cement is holding it.
MC

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Read your policy , its wind damage so insurance should pay.
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Well, I did basically the same thing, I went up on the roof and put the top "cap" tiles back in place. Most were intact, one totally destroyed when it fell off the roof, thru my screen porch screen roof. A few fell to the grass and then are ok. a few were cracked into about 3-4 pieces.
The cracked ones should be repairable with the RT-600 adhesive if I can find any - Home Depot is always out of it. The adhesive will also cement the cement tiles back in place. I'm not sure where to replace the one that was destroyed.
I was worried about walking on the roof and cracking tiles but that didn't happen. I read that you should put your weight on the ends of the tiles and walk horizontally and not up and down the roof. It was a bit scary since I have a 2-story house, but after I got comfortable with it, I took a good look around and had a beautiful view.
I did have some tiles that slid down and had to be pushed back into place. I wish I kept track of them to apply the adhesive. Some are cracked and will have to be repaired.
I have no idea how much it would have cost to hire someone to do this. It is a fairly easy job if you can handle the heights and are careful. One of the trickiest parts was getting back on the ladder to go down. I had the ladder about 5 ft. higher than the roof edge - maybe it should be lower to be able to step into it instead of around it.
Gary Davis
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Tiles-copper or stainless nails are 100 yr products, adhesive caulk 5-10 yr, you dont mix the 2. Mortar is better on the cap
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I made my 2nd trip up to the roof over the weekend to adhesive the tiles to the roof and fix the cracked tiles. I noticed that even the cap tiles that were not blown off were really not glued down. I applied the RT-600 to all the tiles that were dislodged as well as some that were just sitting there. No wonder so many roofs had their cap tiles blown off - only gravity was holding them there, apparently.
Also, having the ladder just a foot or so above the roof edge made it much easier getting off and back on it.
Gary
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You never know til you try. After Charley my cousin got a bid to replace all the tile roof on his house for $9k, the insurance co. gave him $12k. He put the extra $3k down on a new 23' Wellcraft.
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