Coax vs flat twin?

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On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 08:19:42 -0400, PVR wrote:

300 ohm twinlead is not shielded so it picks up interference more easily than coax. Also, wet weather and running it next to metal can affect the impedance of the wire pair causing signal mismatch. Usually these things don't happen, however. When installed properly, it is usually less lossy than coax.
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What is recommended by OEM for that particular Radio Long wire, 300 ohm, 75 ohm, or 50 then you need to decide what to use, whatever you use in order to get good reception Antenna and feeder line/coax must match ohms impedance of your radio in must cases any TV antenna will do good job but remember that TV antenna is directional and it must be impedance match to you radio. KA2AYS

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wrote:

Everything in my previous post still applies but I see you were aksing about radio. Radios don't have that stupid feature so many tvs have these days that turns the picture and sound off if the signal is not strong enough.
And they can often take a really weak signal and still get good reception out of it, especially if there isn't a nearby frequency that is stronger.
I only have one FM radio connected to an attic antenna. In other rooms I rely on the built-in, and there is a tremendous difference from one radio to another.
It doesn't seem to be based on price. Right now, my best radio is cheap Sylvania clock radio from the 60's or 70's with an analog clock but not even a sleep switch, in my kitchen and it gets WAMU and WCSP well. Another one that works well is also cheap plastic.
OTOH, I don't get really good results with some fancy black "receivers" (matching in shape to black vcrs).
Antenna is very important, and where the AC cord is the antenna, I sometimes have to move the AC cord around to get good reception. That should go away with an outdoor antenna.
I go to flea markets, yard sales, and hamfests, and I often buy table radios. A dollar or two.
Reception comes and goes also. Maybe they are fiddling with their signal, which aiui can be very tailored to specific directions, not just a big circle.
I have a digital display, AM-FM clock radio with two alarms (each with buzzer, radio, or both in sequence) from 1973 that used to get WAMU, 88.5, in DC and now doesn't get it. It used to get WCSP, 101.9 in DC, then got it badly for about 4 months, and now it's back to getting it well.
OTOH, another radio, expensive in a wood cabinet ($150?), with a separate left speaker, whose AM tuner is terrible, gets both DC FM stations well. Yet it can't get well anymore 88.1, WYPR, right in Baltimore. I have to call the local station and ask them to fix their signal. I think that can work sometimes. But I can get that local station without static on my 15 dollar clock radio with the 1.5 inch speaker. The sound isn't very good though because the speaker is cheap.
I went to a demonstration of the expensive one they advertise at night sometimes. The demo was five miles farther from DC than my house is, and their cheap model (500 dollars) didn't gget the stations I wanted. Their thousand dollar model did, fairly well, and might have worked better at home, but it was 1000 dolllars. I think because they insisted they would give me back my money, I bought the cheaper one, and it did NOT work better at my hosue, and I sent it back and they gave me back my money.
P&M, reply by post.

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