Cloth covered wiring - dangerous or ok?

My 1950's vintage rambler has some newer wiring, but also some older (probably original) cloth covered wiring, which I discovered on changing out some sockets. What is the story on this type of wiring? Is it ok to leave it? I imagine replacing it would be enormously expensive.
Thanks.
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Dave



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Airkings wrote:

Yes, expensive.
50's Romex almost certainly has individual conductors with TW (plastic) insulation. Unless subjected to high temps (like in ceiling fixture boxes), the conductor insulation should be good for a long time to come. If you find brittle/burned insulation, then be concerned.
Jim
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if it aint broke dont fix it. it lasted this long...
randy

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On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:47:36 GMT, "Airkings"

I don't know if this applies to you, but I have a bunch of BX with cloth insulated conductors in my (1949-built) house. The parts of it I get to see, (the last couple of inches in each box) seems brittle and easily damaged. I also had only 4 circuits for the whole house.
My plan has been to put in new circuits for anything that uses real current, leaving just lights, TVs, etc. on the original wiring. So now I have circuits for each window AC, the refrigerator, microwave, workshop, washer, dryer and even the computer I'm typing this on. (that one was mosly for convenience).
I figure I'm lowering my chances of a problem a little bit at a time. A circuit that used to have two window ACs, plus a refrigerator (electricity must have been a minor consideration when this house was built) and a smattering of other stuff now handles just a TV, a clock radio and two ceiling fixtures. Less current, less heat, fewer problems, I hope.
Greg Guarino
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wrote:

If yo are going to add a lot of new stuff you might as well go ahead and replace the old wiring. It probably will not be that much more to do
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wrote:

In some houses that might be true. I live in a brick house with interior walls of plaster and no accessible attic. There's also no basement and the lower floor is all finished with the exception of the garage and the boiler room/laundry room.
I assume that there is a web of old wiring between the two floors of the house, and some more up through the interior walls to the second floor ceiling fixtures. I'd have to tear up finished ceilings just to FIND the old wiring. Since I can decide where to run the new circuits, I've been able to make just a few strategic openings.
Greg Guarino
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