Clearing Toilet Siphon Jet Passageway


I have a Crane toilet I installed new in 1985. It worked normally for many years. Then over the past year or so the flushing action slowed until it now requires two or three attempts to obtain a complete flush. I suspect that a clogged passageway to the siphon jet is not allowing water to enter the bowl fast enough to create a flush (I can achieve a complete flush on the first attempt by dumping a bucket of water directly into the bowl, so I know the bowl-to-sewer pipe passage is clear). I've inserted #14 gauge solid wire a couple of inches into each bowl rim rinse hole to check for clogs (e.g. mineral deposits) and found none. I've also done the same thing to the siphon jet hole at the bottom of the bowl....again no clog found there. I've snaked 1/8" flexible steel cable through each of the four largest rim rinse holes and through the large tank-to-bowl hole as far as I could push it....2 or 3 ft. depending on the particular hole......again with no obvious evidence of clogs.
I'm wondering if the internal passageway(s) leading to the siphon jet are clogged somewhere beyond the point (probably a sharp bend in the passageway) I can reach with the solid wire or the flexible cable. I'd like to fill all the passageways (both rim rinse and siphon jet) with calcium/lime/rust remover solution and let it sit for a day or so. Toward that end I've tried sealing the rim rinse holes with duct tape (after cleaning the rim) and plugging the siphon jet with plumber's putty. No dice.....the putty loosens almost right away and the tape does so after only a few minutes.....then the solution drains to the bottom of the bowl.
Anyone have any suggestions for adequately sealing the rinse and siphon holes so the chemical solution can have time to work?
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If you are wanting to clean the passage way to the holes on the underside of the rim of the bowl, Use wads of paper towel held in place with a putty (plumber's putty) all the way around the underside of the rim. Then pour an acid based cleaner into the overflow tube in the tank. This will clean out the pathway to the holes, and the paper towel will keep it in place to allow it to work.
-g
Chuck wrote:

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garmo wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Garmo-
Thanks for responding, but I've found that when the chemical solution comes in contact with the plumber's putty the putty loosens and allows the solution to drain too soon (see my original post above). The paper towel would absorb the solution then the putty would be exposed to it and would loosen.
-Chuck
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Chuck wrote:

I had the same problem a couple of years ago. I do remember pouring something into the tank and I remember cleaning out the little holes under the rim. I might have used a coat hanger or maybe a stiff wire--I can't remember. Whatever I did the toilet has been working good ever since.
Try looking at these two websites:
http://www.factsfacts.com/MyHomeRepair/SlowFlush.htm
http://www.toiletology.com/lazy.shtml
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Many toilets have a jet which shoots into the bottom of the bowl. It's not easy to see, but it comes in from the front (away from the wall) side, and squirts towards the back of the bowl, towards the wall, and up the drain.
I've bent a coat hanger into a 7 shape, and used the top bar of the 7 to ream out the hole. I've also cleared the water out of the bowl (turkey baster) and then poured muriatic acid into the bowl. To get some acid into the jet.
Please let us know how things work out.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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replying to Stormin Mormon, KPLLOYD wrote:

Be carefull with the muriatic acid I tried to save a customers old mineral bound bowl, it attacked the epoxy casting plug in the bottom of the trap ! I hate to say this but some times I have luck using a powerful shop vac to suck out trap ! 9 times out of 10 I replace the whole toilet bowl if it is not flushing good . Toilets can run you $ 65.00 to $500.00 It is up to your wallet how you want to deal with this problem. KP
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http://www.dulley.com/tip/t1145.shtml Click to back to Main Tips List
Dulley's Money-Saving Tip #1145 Clean out the flush jet in a toilet
(related Dulley column topic links - 558) Recently, the toilet in my office did not flush properly. The water in the bowl just swirled around and did not flush well. I ran an toilet auger through the bowl and it all seemed open. I call several plumbers and they all said that they would come out and clean out the drain for about $100. My last call was to an older retired plumber who said that the flush jet was clogged. This is a very common in our area because of hard water and I would not be surprised if the other plumbers knew this too. This jet forces water into the drain to start the flushing action.
To fix this common problem, find the flush jet (a small hole about the size of a finger) in the bottom of the bowl. Poke a stiff wire or ice pick into the hole to clear out any hard water deposits. It takes about 60 seconds to do. Several brands of toilets have the flush jet hidden up inside the drain and it is difficult to get to. Empty the bowl and dump some white vinegar into the overflow tube in the tank. The vinegar will flow down into the bowl and jet area and hopefully loosen hard water deposits.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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