clearing clogged sink drain

A bathroom sink drain is clogged almost 100%. I used a basic snake attached to my drill. It goes down 5' and stops. I opened the hatch in the ceiling of the closet below. There is a sideways T fitting that the snake doesn't get past. The top of the T has a plug. The problem is there is now a/c ducts blocking access to the T.
Is there some other kind of snake that will get around the 90 degree angle? I have not poured a liquid plumber type product down the drain. It has been a couple days. so I expect at this point the only water in the drain is in the P-trap.
Now the P-trap does not have a plug at the bottom, but a section of it could be removed.
A plunger doesn't work as the sink has overflow holes. I don't see how they can be closed off enough to withstand the force of the plunge.
My next step is to call a plumber, but I thought I would ask you all first.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

You may be able to wiggle it around the bend but they are really made for sanitary fittings with a sweep type turn.
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On Mon, 31 Oct 2016 22:11:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I tried twice. After the trap there is a bend (behind the a/c ducts) that it does go around before it gets to the T.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

There are pressure solutions but I would remove the trap before I did it if it is that thin plastic compression stuff.
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On Tue, 01 Nov 2016 11:48:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This is the trap:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/S-trap.jpg
I don't follow about the thin compression stuff.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

These days that trap would all be thin wall plastic. Do you have a compressor? You could use water pressure but that could get messy. I would try to make an adapter that connects to the trap (disconnected from the tail piece from the sink) and see if you can blow the clog on down the line. That galvanized will tolerate the pressure and once it gets to the cast iron it should go away. If you go that way, it is good you have not used any drain cleaner because it may come back at you.
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On Tue, 01 Nov 2016 12:37:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I do not.
When I was at Harbor Freight for my "No Purchase Required" gift of the day, the cashier suggested a digital inspection camera. But looking at the one on their website ($80 - 20% = $64) I see the cable is not long enough, nor would it make it around a corner.

I've thought about blowing up the opened S-trap, but I don't see how to make an attachment. I don't have a machine shop. Though probably in March I will get the drill press at my mom's and bring it to my place. Not owing a car limits moving things around.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Very impressive! It would be a fun tool to have. I do need to place an order with Amazon. The mirror attachment might get me to look down the T. Though I have to get it to also go around a bend somewhere.
I see several similar to pick from.

Looks impressive, but I see you have to request a quote and buy direct. I do want something to periodically (like every few years) to keep the kitchen drain free of grease.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 10/31/2016 09:42 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

Have you ruled out using a chemical drain opener? At least for soap/hair clogs I've found that the thick Drano Max gel (comes in a yellow plastic container - Home Depot has it) often works wonders when other types of chemical openers (not the acid ones) fail. I've used the Drano product with success on completely plugged bathroom sink and tub drains. Sincerely,
--
J. B. Wood e-mail: arl snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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As I wrote I have not. The stop is 5 feet in. Some chemical will be lost in the trap. The drain pipe is 1-1/2". Will it even make it down to the blockage?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Tuesday, November 1, 2016 at 5:54:30 AM UTC-7, Don Wiss wrote:

Try taping over the overflow holes in the sink. It has worked for me. A last resort would pouring a gallon of bleach down the drain and let it sit all night and then pour boiling water down the drain.
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Would tape really hold? The next problem is the sink is very small. I regular toilet plunger is too big. Possibly something like: http://www.harborfreight.com/power-plunger-99644.html
Then a correction. It is an S trap, not a P trap. If I remove the middle piece, I have an open end facing downwards. But I don't know how to push air into it.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 11/1/16 11:06 AM, Jack G. wrote:

I have a sink that is similar, with 2 "openings" on the bottom (that I think are more intended to be used for "mounting posts" (from the floor) than for "overflow".
A little off-topic, but is there anything that works to "plug" the holes so a plunger can be used on the sink (without water coming out)...?
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wrote:

I would use a rotating, power, spring style snake. Used properly, that should make it past the T.
What kind of material is the pipe made from? If galvanized pipe, it could be rusted closed, in that case, you will probably have to bite the bullet and replace some piping.
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I used this: http://www.harborfreight.com/25-ft-drain-cleaner-with-drill-attachment-66262.html
Is there something different?

Is it galvanized. To replace would require removing a/c ductwork. See:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/T-in-drain-pipe.jpg
That looks like 2" pipe. Awfully wide to have a nearly 100% blockage.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

I have seen 2" galvanized pipes rust up over time, especially if people have been using chemical drain cleaners in them. As most new homes have been using PVC drain pipes for 30 - 40 years, odds are your pipes are older than that?
As for the snake, this is the type of tool to which I an referring:
http://thd.co/2eR5lJ8
They can be rented at a reasonable price. However, why not just call a drain cleaning company. If the pipe isn't destroyed, around here they will come out and clear your drain for $60.
If the pipe is destroyed, you will have to bite the bullet and replace it, preferably with PVC.
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The house is 1892. But that bathroom was added later. Possibly in the 1950s. The large horizontal cast iron pipe would be original, as there originally were sinks for each bedroom in the pass through between them.

I do have a couple rental places down the hill. This is what is at the place where I have an account: http://mytoolrental.com/plumbing-equip/

That is useful advice. I had been thinking of calling the local plumber, but the drain cleaning people are cheaper and could be even better for such a job.

And I will have to dismantle the a/c ductwork.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

My money is on the pipe being rusted shut, but for your sake, I hope not.

I own a power, rotary snake. It made more sense to buy one than to keep on renting when I considered all of the different houses in the extended family.

Ya gotta do what ya gotta do.
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Update time! The most useful advice from this thread was to hire a drain clearing specialist and not a general plumber, which was what I was planning to do before I posted here. I had a card from when I used Mr. Sewer in 2003 to clear my sewer line. I had even scanned it and had it on my page of my local home service vendors.
I called him. Mr. Sewer died, but his helper bought the business and renamed it Clogbusters. He first tried a snake. He had the same result as I: it hitting that T and not getting past. So what he did was to drill a hole on the side of the pipe below the T and snake upwards. It was filled with rust. But this trick saved me from having to dismantle the ductwork and replacing the pipes. I paid $250 cash for about 1-3/4 hours for him and a helper.
I like hiring low overhead vendors. It is just the owner, the helper, a truck, and a garage he rents for $400/month. Plus he pays $12,000 annually for all the insurance he has to carry.
The second bit I liked from the replies was to buy the $15 endoscope camera. In this case I did not see it helping. The mirror that sees around the corner would have come off. But for the price it is a toy I would like to have around.
Thanks all for your help.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

Keep in mind, that rust came from the pipe wall in the area of the clog. I wonder how much of the pipe wall is left and how much longer it will last before it collapses completely and leaves you with a mess in the crawl space.
Did he tell you how large of an opening he was able to make through the clog? Was he able to get out all the rust and bring it back to being a 2" pipe?
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