chemicals used by www.nature2.com


Does anyone know what chemicals are used by the Nature2 pool filter to reduce the amount of chlorine and algaecide needed? I think someone said that it reduces the phosphates in the water, which make the algae bloom. Somewhere else, I read that mixing them with copper will stain your pool. Please cc me in case I forget this post.
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If no one knows here-- the certainly will, *here*; http://www.poolspaforum.com/forum/index.php
Jim
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Deodiaus wrote the following:

A Nature2 sanitizer is like a 'catalytic converter' for the pool. It contains copper and silver particles and other trace minerals. Since copper is a natural algaecide, It reduces the need for algeacide and chlorine. I really do not know how it works, but it does. I have been using one in my inground pool for over 10 years, replacing the cannister every two years.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Deodiaus wrote:

As per usual, look at the MSDS data ...
Copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4*5H20) (Cupric sulfate)
Silver (Ag) metal
Aluminum Oxide (Al203)
--
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On 03/07/10 6:47 AM, dpb wrote:

I tried one of those Nature 2 devices, but it really does nothing other than empty your wallet. Ditto for "Pool Wizard."
Keep the chlorine at 3 ppm, the ph at 7.4, and the phosphates at close to zero (I use Orenda PR10,000 because it's the most cost effective, but there are plenty of other phosphate removers as well) and your pool will be fine. You should not have to use algeacide. Also watch your cyanuric acid level because chlorine tablets will raise it too high.
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I learned (the hard way) that the "total alkalinity" was important, too. Getting it out of whack can *really* screw up the pool chemistry in quite odd ways.
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