chainsaw reccomendation or advice ?

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I have done the google searches. Now the internet is filled with 50/50 conflicting advice and reviews.
Does anyone her have experience with the big retailer brand gas powered chainsaws ?
I am looking for probably 18"- 20" gas powered chainsaw to clear and thin out some under brush, saplings, scrub oaks, limbs and occasional downed trees from my parents wooded property ( there is about 2 acres of overgrown wooded area they want cleaned up ) .
So, i was looking at the big box DIY stores and i see Homelight, Poulan, ECHO, Stihl, Blue Max, Ryobi, Poulan Pro, Husqvarna with prices from 149 - 499.
I would like to stick to lower end prices.
Is there a best of the cheap ?
thanks for helpful replies, robb
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I have done the google searches. Now the internet is filled with 50/50 conflicting advice and reviews.
Does anyone her have experience with the big retailer brand gas powered chainsaws ?
I am looking for probably 18"- 20" gas powered chainsaw to clear and thin out some under brush, saplings, scrub oaks, limbs and occasional downed trees from my parents wooded property ( there is about 2 acres of overgrown wooded area they want cleaned up ) .
So, i was looking at the big box DIY stores and i see Homelight, Poulan, ECHO, Stihl, Blue Max, Ryobi, Poulan Pro, Husqvarna with prices from 149 - 499.
I would like to stick to lower end prices.
Is there a best of the cheap ?
thanks for helpful replies, robb
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For just this task I had earlier a 16" Husqvarna and then a 20" Poulan, both of which were troublesome (and one died). Five years ago I bought (used) a 14" Stihl which does more work, is lighter thus easier to handle, and starts and runs trouble-free.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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I have done the google searches. Now the internet is filled with 50/50 conflicting advice and reviews.
Does anyone her have experience with the big retailer brand gas powered chainsaws ?
I am looking for probably 18"- 20" gas powered chainsaw to clear and thin out some under brush, saplings, scrub oaks, limbs and occasional downed trees from my parents wooded property ( there is about 2 acres of overgrown wooded area they want cleaned up ) .
So, i was looking at the big box DIY stores and i see Homelight, Poulan, ECHO, Stihl, Blue Max, Ryobi, Poulan Pro, Husqvarna with prices from 149 - 499.
I would like to stick to lower end prices.
Is there a best of the cheap ?
thanks for helpful replies, robb
This is a troll, right? Best and cheap cannot be used in the same sentence. Except by me.
Steve
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Do you want to buy one saw or two? If the answer is one, buy a Stihl or Husq.
The alternative is to buy a cheap saw now and the good saw after you get frustrated with the junk and buy a good one next time. If you want a Homelight, look in the wood near me where I tossed it after it did not start again..
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On Fri, 23 Sep 2011 13:34:00 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

I have a Homelite Ranger 33 someone gave me because it wouldn't start 6 years ago. I figured it was junk but I cleaned the carb and it fired up (main jet plugged). I have been using it ever since. It may be junk but as long as it works I will keep it.
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robb wrote:

Avoid Poulan, Homelight. Probably Ryobi too. You didn't ask but avoid Sears too.
Maybe, Poulan Pro & Blue Max,not familiar with either.
Consider Stihl, Echo & Husqvarna ________________

Yes. Go look at Stihl... http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/?gclid=CN33sJ_7s6sCFYEj7AodJ2qwcA
and try out the product selector link.
Stihl makes saws for varied uses but regardless of the use type, their saws are superior.
Regarding bar length, you probably don't need 18" - 20" for what you want to do. A 14" bar can cut a very sizeable log - up to almost 28" - and a shorter bar means a lighter and easier to use saw.
In 2004 we had a bunch of hurricanes and wound up with 100s of tons of trashed oak debris. I bought a 14" Stihl and there was very little I could not cut; for the too large stuff I bought a longer bar & chain but rarely use them.
--

dadiOH
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robb wrote:

I suspect you're considering "cheap" because of the anticipated, rare, use.
If I'm correct, consider an electric chain saw (and 200' of extension cord*, possibly home-made). Unlike 2-cycle gas tools, an electric tool will not rot, decay, or develop festering carbuncles if left sitting unused for a year. Electric tools are binary - like a computer. They either work, or they don't. Gas-powered tools are analog: there is a wide range of functioning (works, mostly works, sometimes works, works only in the dark of the moon or a high tide, doesn't work, etc.).
Build yourself a tote-box to carry the saw. Leave room for a quart of oil, spare chain, and the tools necessary to replace/tighten the chain.
--
An acre is a square about 70' on a side. A 200' extension cord should reach
almost all of a two-acre plot. You may need a modest generator if there is
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On 23/09/2011 5:39 PM, HeyBub wrote:

from. Up here, an acres measures just slightly over 208' on a side.
But, I agree with your comments about the saws. My first one was a Homelite which lasted all of about a year and a half, or about six cords of wood. Scraped it, bought a Stihl 290 and it just keeps on going, and going, and...
Gil
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Gil wrote:

(Slaps head). You're absolutely correct on the size of an acre. 43,560 sq ft, or a square 208 ft on a side. Therefore, depending on the configuration of the plot, to use an electric chainsaw the lumberjack would need an extension cord of about 300'.
If the plot was one foot wide and 90,000 feet long, he may need an extension cord some seventeen MILES in length, but that's hardly likely.
Still, to be prepared...
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Save all the math...and cord...buy a generator!
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Main problem with electric cars. Cars no problem, but 250 mile cord was.
Steve
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wrote:

That would be true if you only had power on one corner of the lot and needed to get to the other corner. If your house is in the middle and you have the NEC required receptacles front and back 100' would get you coverage just about anywhere.
Electric is a good choice for the typical homeowner who occasionally cuts on a tree. If you are one of those "6 cords of firewood a year" guys you need a real chain saw but you probably have a hydraulic log splitter too.
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on 9/24/2011 8:05 AM (ET) HeyBub wrote the following:

There's also the DC to AC power inverters that can be hooked up to the car to run the electric chainsaw. You just have to drive the car close to the work site.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

It would take a pretty big inverter. 400W to 600W is a nice size inverter to keep in your truck for powering lights and stuff like that, but it wouldn't pull even a tiny saw.
Those little Remington electric chainsaws you can buy for less than $100 will get the job done, but boy do they suck to use (I have one.) Very uncomfortable to hold, and they don't have an oil pump. The oil is gravity-fed. All the time. Including when the saw is in storage. I have some professional non-safety chains for another saw that just happen to fit the Remington; I should put one on and see if that makes it less of a pain to use.
Stihl makes several electric saws (MSE-180, MSE-220, etc) as do other pro saw makers. That might be a good option. One good thing about an electric is you can use it indoors.
-Bob
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wrote:

The remington saw is probably designed to work on a pole. I have one I use to trim the palm trees. You can use it as a hand held, but as you say they are not very ergonomic. There are other electrics that are pretty good if you are an occasional user. If you don't use your saw for months at a time and you don't get every drop of fuel out of it before you store it, they will all get cranky to start.
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2011 15:01:51 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the Remington is SEALED.
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On Sep 25, 5:28pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Maybe you have a longer cutting season than most?! B^)
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 04:45:01 -0700 (PDT), Bob_Villa

used a tank of fuel - and it still started the next year.
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On Sep 28, 5:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Oh, see the smiley at the end...maybe he was trying to be amusing! he he
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