Chain Saw Chain - Number of Teeth?

I went to the Borg to get a new chain for my 16" chain saw.
The generic brand they sell had 4 - 5 different 16" chains with the number of teeth ranging from something like 56 to 60.
Each version showed the same list of manufacturers (Echo, Homelite, Stihl, etc) but each version had a different list of model numbers under each manufacturer's name.
For example, only the 56 tooth model had my chain saw's model number on the package but all versions had my brand listed.
So what would happen if I put, let's say, a 60 tooth chain that matches my brand of chain saw but not my model?
In other words, what's the difference between two 16" chain saws for the same brand of saw, one that uses a 57 tooth chain and one that uses a 58 (or 59 or 60) tooth chain?
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The length of the bar assuming you are talking about the same gauge and pitch chain. The size of chain your saw uses, including the number of drivers, should be stamped right on the bar near the saw end.
chain is measured by number of drivers, not the number of teeth.
Chain, other than packages you find int the borgs, does not care about brand namee, only guage, pitch, length. A bar that takes .325 pitch, 058 gauge, 62 dl will fit any brand of saw that useses that size chain.
Harry K
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You are correct, sir. My mistake.
Closer inspection of the package does indeed say 56 drivers, not 56 teeth.
So is the different number of drivers on the different 16" chains based on the gear that drives the chain? In other words, why does a 16" chain for one Stihl model have 56 drivers, another 16" chain for a different Stihl model have 57 drivers, etc?
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On 3/17/2012 9:54 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

it's all about the length, and that is dictated by the bar. There are different bars that are all considered 16".
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On Sat, 17 Mar 2012 19:54:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

The drivers affect the match to the gear. Same as if you were matching teeth on two gears. If one gear has 10 teeth per inch, the other one needs the same or they wont mesh. The amount of teeth dont matter, it's the drivers must match the gear or it wont work. Then the bar needs the proper thickness of the drivers to fit correctly in the groove.
Look up the make and model of your saw on the web. Find a downloadable manual, it will tell you what to buy, or give you a phone number to call. The packages on those generic chains are mostly worthless.
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On Mar 17, 10:23pm, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

Or just look on the bar and buy a chain with the size and driver number specified on it. I don't think think there are any bars anymore that don't have the info stamped right on them. I could be wrong tho, just ask my wife.
Harry K
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re: "I don't think think there are any bars anymore that don't have the info stamped right on them."
I assume by "anymore" that you are referring to "age of bar", right?
I'm assuming that you mean all "newer" bars have that info on them. Since you have no idea how old my saw is, you can't possibly know if mine fits the "anymore" category. And I mean that in the nicest way. ;-)
The fact is, your wife is right...meaning that you aren't.
The only numbers stamped on my bar are PA01222 and F1*. The PA number is the part number for the bar.
The manual does say that I need a 56 driver chain for that bar, so the generic packaging at Home Depot was right.
Anyway, thanks for the info. The stumps are cut, the chain is probably ruined, but the $16 doesn't hurt too badly.
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As time goes on, you will be paying that extra $6 multip tims. It is not difficult
The real answer is to learn to sharpen it yourself. With our attitude toward the cost of things, invest in a carbide chain for that saw and it will stay sharp a lot longer.
Harry K
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Man, I messed up that post badly. Try again:
As time goeson you will be paying that $6 multiple times. The real answer is to learn to sharpen it yourself - it's not difficult. For around $6 you can get a file guide with instructions and a file and be set to resharpen. That $16 chain should last you more than 10 years per your useage.
A carbide chain might be an sanwer - they will stand a lot of abuse and still cut.
BTW. Teh tone of each an every one of your replies to me has been over the top sarcastic. If you don't want advice, don't ask!
Harry K
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If it's the same design of chain, and tooth spacing. Just means that you have to adjust the bar in or out a bit more.
For example, the 3/8 chain that my old Homelite, I could use 59 or 60 links, with no worries at all. I think my blue one took 59, the orange saw took 60. No big deal.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I went to the Borg to get a new chain for my 16" chain saw.
The generic brand they sell had 4 - 5 different 16" chains with the number of teeth ranging from something like 56 to 60.
Each version showed the same list of manufacturers (Echo, Homelite, Stihl, etc) but each version had a different list of model numbers under each manufacturer's name.
For example, only the 56 tooth model had my chain saw's model number on the package but all versions had my brand listed.
So what would happen if I put, let's say, a 60 tooth chain that matches my brand of chain saw but not my model?
In other words, what's the difference between two 16" chain saws for the same brand of saw, one that uses a 57 tooth chain and one that uses a 58 (or 59 or 60) tooth chain?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Is there not a saw shop in your town? Those guys make a living dealing with saws, and making up a chain loop puts the food on their family's table.
As an added bonus, they are usually a lot cheaper than the big box store, and they will sell you the right file you need to resharpen your chain, too. If you are nice, and they are not too busy, they will be happy to show you how to do this.
So do yourself and your local community a favor and spend your money with a local business; you'll get better service and save yourself some money.
Jon
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Alright then, I'm going to let you off with a warning this time, but next time I see you around these parts I'm going to at least want to see some round files on your pocket.
Jon
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A professional grade chain will have twice as many teeth. A little safer with less teeth, for amateurs.
Greg
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