Central Air "Top Up" Not Allowed?

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That's crap. He's just trying to sell you a new unit. What changed is that as of 2010 manufacturers are no longer allowed to make new equipment that uses r22. R22 can still be use dto service exitsing equipment. R22 is being phased out. As of 2020 r22 it's self will not be manufactured, only reclaimed/recycled r22 can be used. R22 will get real expensive then. It's possible someone will come up with a substitute that can be used in r22 systems between now and then but no one has so far. The newer refridgerants run at a significantly higher pressure and can't be used in an r22 system.
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Agree with the above. You need an honest tech. The system should be checked for leaks. If it's a leak that can be easily and inexpensively fixed, then you could do that and then re-charge the system. If it's a leak in the coils, etc. then it's time for a new system.
Even if you're selling your home, you might get most or all of the money back. A home inspector is going to flag a 20 year old AC as being near it's end of life. Doesn't mean you have any obligation to replace it, but it will make the buyers more nervous and they may use some other issue to hardball or scuttle the deal. And if you have a new system, you can feature that you have a brand new high efficiency HVAC system as a selling point. A lot of people just want a house with no issues. Also look into the various rebates that are available from utilities, state gov, etc. Last year the FEDS had a 30% tax credit on the purchase of a new system that met certain efficiency standards.
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wrote:

Having sold a home not long ago:(
90% of buyers want one in pristine shape, so they dont have to do anything but move in.
So the old AC means 90% of buyers wouldnt even consider it.
That will make your home harder to sell:(
and right now you can pick who installs your new unit.
Once the buyer gets a home inspector involved:( We demand a TRANE or any highest priced unit installed with the best 20 year warranty and all the bells and whistles, like variable speed AC in canada and a R30 AC efficency. Its costly but we dont care were the buyer:)
Before buyers get involved you can select exactly what you want, and just say AC is new last year.
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On 5/31/2011 7:11 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

ERRRRRRRR! Wrong, manufacturers no longer ship systems containing R-22. We purchase and install new R-22 equipment referred to as "dry" systems. The equipment has no refrigerant in it. At the start of Spring, I installed a new condensing unit designed for R-22 for a customer who didn't need everything replaced. The condensing unit came from the factory charged with nitrogen. The new equipment we obtain from the supply house has the new refrigerant R-410A and enough is in the new condensing unit for a matching evaporator and a 15-20foot line set. My suppliers have a hard time keeping "new" dry R-22 equipment in stock because of demand. :-)
TDD
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On May 31, 10:29 am, "Stormin Mormon"

ok, my bad. Sort of a symantics thing. There are not supposed ot be any new complete r22 systems sold. Yes, you can buy every part of a system.
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On 5/31/2011 2:45 PM, jamesgangnc wrote:

You can buy a complete R-22 system, it just won't have any R-22 in it. :-)
TDD
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wrote:

True enough. There is some debate about this now in the industry. The intent of the law was to stop the sale and installtion of new r22 systems after 2010. The actual wording of the law prevents the sale of pre-charged r22 equipment after 2010. Thus creating the loophole for the sale of empty r22 equipment. Some are mad at the manufacturers for continuing to make the r22 equipment since a lot of them have been telling customers that after 2010 you won't be able to buy r22 equipment. The downturn in the economy has contributed a bit as well with more people looking for ways to get by as cheaply as possible. The situation has lead to some techs offering to replace r22 systems with new r22 systems for less than the cost of a new r410a system.
I can't complain about it myself since I picked up a new r22 system just last month. My house has two systems. One is a 3 year old r22 system and the other is a 19 year old r22 system. I picked up a matching r22 system, dry of course, so that I could replace the 19 year old one with one that matches the 3 year old one. Having 2 the same makes troubleshooting a breeze. I'm not real worried about the availability of r22 for the next 5 or 6 years. After that I'll just keep a can for myself.
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On 6/1/2011 8:05 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Me and my buddy GB are repairing more than we replace but we do install new R-410A systems when a whole system needs replacing. The problem is a great many HVAC companies have and have had a policy of replace instead of repair. Me and my friend are just the opposite, we will repair if possible and only replace if necessary. It's actually easier to replace a condensing unit than it is to replace its compressor but I do it all the time and am quite good at it. The caveat is the warranty on a new compressor is one year and the warranty on a new condensing unit is 5 years but you have to tell the customer the truth and give them a choice. If I see that the condenser coil is in good shape and the fan and other electrical parts are good, I recommend replacing the compressor but if the coil is beat up and the fan motor is soon to die, I tell the customer a condensing unit is a better deal especially if it's a beat up heat pump with all the extra components that can die.
TDD
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On Mon, 30 May 2011 18:53:19 -0700, WandererFan wrote:

If it's boarder line there is no legal reason not to top it off. May be a company policy designed to sell you a new system.
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Chris,
It is BS. 22 is widely available and will be for some time to come.
Call another reputable company.
Colbyt
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WandererFan wrote the following:

I'm not responding to your question, just giving some advice. When you are posting a question, especially in this home repair group, it would be wise to indicate where you are located, so that you don't get responses that don't apply where you are. You'll note that some of the responses do not not apply to your situation and have disparaged the tech, although he was correct for your location.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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If the refrigerant's low, it's LEAKING.
A licensed pro can't legally top off a refrigeration system with a known leak. If the EPA gets wind of it he'd face fines and would probably lose his license.
Odds are a leak would require the replacement of one or more major components. Once you start replacing major components on a unit that old, you are better off in the long run to simply replace it. You will be chasing problem after problem if you try to fix it.
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On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 10:53:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

automotive AC, bad "O" rings. Minor components can leak as much as major components.
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They do call HVAC service guys to come out to a house to see if they will do things like that. OTOH, you can always take a couple of wrenches to a fitting, snug it up and swear it was leaking.
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