Cement tile Roof Repair in a Valley

I have a leak in a valley on my cement tile roof(flat interlocking). I climbed up to investigate and noticed that there was a channel in the valley (approx. 4" wide). I lifted a loose tile and noticed that the felt paper around the channel was very deteriorated. It would crumble when touch in the hand. I want to do the repair myself. I just need some clarification on a couple of things. Here is what I plan to do and tell me if it is correct.
I'm going to:
1. Remove the tile on each side of the channel from the top to the bottom. I'll go as wide as I need to until the felt looks good and go one more. 2. I'll remove the old channel. It looks like it is in good condition. If I can reuse it I will. 3. I'll remove the deteriorated portion of the felt. 4. I'm not sure but, there is probably some type of nail board that the tile gets nailed to. If I need to, I'll remove them to. 5. I'll repaper the valley going across from to to bottom overlapping 6". 6. I replace or reinstall the channel. 7. Replace the nail boards (If I removed them.) 8. Reinstall the cement tile. Replacing any broken ones.
I'm I off base on this. Please guide me in he right direction.
Thanks in advance
PS the channel is about 10'-12' long.
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Use new copper valley and expect all the felt to be crap, so where will you stop??? The leak may be at the peak. Find leak first.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in message

When I went into the attic, I could see staining on one side of the valley. I hope this is were the leak is because I re-did everything on this one side of the valley. It was about 100 square feet. Yes, the paper within 3 feet of the valley was crap. Now I'll just sit and wait to see if the side I fixed leaks. If its the other side, I'm not sure were to or how to stop without doinr the whole thing.
thanks for the help.
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On 12 Nov 2004 16:07:38 -0800, suarez snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Kevin) wrote:

I've repaired my 80-year-old concrete tile roof several times myself, on the apron roof sections, but when it started leaking three stories up I called in the pros!
They removed and stacked all the tiles to one side, replaced the wood underlayment wherever it was rotten, and put down peel-and-stick type ice and water membrane against the wood. If memory serves, they then put down regular felt over that, replaced the wooden tile hanger strips (most of the originals were rotted away) and then relaid the tiles.
If your roof still leaks around the valley, you might try the membrane.
The copper sheets used in the valleys on my roof are around twice as wide as on a normal asphalt roof, maybe more, and have a 1 1/2" ridge standing up in the middle of the valley. This ridge directs the water into the valley and keeps it from flowing under the tiles on the other side of the valley, as well as providing a barrier for the row of tiles next to the valley to rest against.
I once had a guy replace two small valleys on the apron roof who used just regular width copper ( 18" I think) and didn't provide the little ridge. He also used regular roofing felt.
The valleys just didn't work at all like they were supposed to and when they got clogged with leaves, the roof leaked because the water spread under the adjoining tiles and flowed under the valley. When the felt got soaked, the water came through the wood underlayment and into the house.
I don't know if all concrete tile roof valleys are made like mine, but if they are, you need that little ridge and the extra wide copper flashing under the tiles.
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Get a moisture meter to pinpoint the leak, guessing is for dummies.
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mRansley wrote:>Get a moisture meter to pinpoint the leak, guessing is for dummies.

Moisture meter?? Pinpoint the leak?? This meter better have a pretty good range! Tom Work at your leisure!
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Yes moisture meter, they have probes you stick in the wood and measure % moisture.
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mRansley wrote:>Yes moisture meter, they have probes you stick in the wood and measure %

So anything above the operating range of the meter will be the "pinpointed" area? Tom Work at your leisure!
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suarez wrote:>I'm going to:

You're right to do the entire valley. You may also want to lap the valley channel (metal?) UNDER the adjacent underlayment. Also go under with any felt you fill in. Good luck. Tom Work at your leisure!
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Like, OH MY GAWD!!!! Not in the VALLEY!!!
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