Cement placer

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And there are also expensive hole saw cutters. No one has yet thought about a swinging scaffold.
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Wrong answer...
A foundation "cut out" isn't necessarily "cut" as it can be designed into the pour and framed in when the forms are being put together...
Also, cutouts in foundations used for window and door openings require framing to attach the door/window to...
As to the issue of the metal fan ducting being attacked by concrete, there is a simple solution to that problem that involves the creative use of the waterproof roofing under layment membrane...
Someone also mentioned the OP needing exterior access to prevent chip out when the hole is made in the wall -- perhaps that is ideal but not required -- there will be some kind of flashing or trim ring that comes with the fan exhaust ducting to conceal the transition between the duct and the wall...
~~ Evan
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in
See, your previous sarcastic and unpleasant answer was totally unnecessary!
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That advice is only good if the wall doesn't need to comply with a fire rating... Otherwise canned foam is not an approved method of firestopping...
~~ Evan
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Evan wrote:

I wouldn't think a fan would do much for a fire rating either...
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Not true at all, a rated exhaust fan will have a damper inside which can close that is normally held open by fusible links...
You see the same sort of arrangements in some buildings ductwork where the fire compartments must be maintained, at a compartment wall there will be a set of similar dampers inside the ductwork at the boundary...
~~ Evan
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Brick wall, metal fan... I don't see anything wrong.
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It's also not as strong.
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2011 01:24:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

blade that will shovel in a pretty good amount of concrete at a time.
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On 8/31/2011 5:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

IMHO, this falls into the Life Is Too Short category. For a couple hundred bucks, a concrete cutting company can put a pretty hole through there in an hour, using their honking big drill.
--
aem sends...



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What a load of ridiculous answers! Couple of hundred bucks, indeed! What part of the world do you come from? There's not a contractor out there who'll move off his fat butt for a job of less than $1000. You can't even get a quote for a job this small!
Further let me make it quite clear: This is alt.home.repair, not alt.line.the.pockets.of.some.wealthy.worker. Like the TV show, "This Old House" you all seem to have lost the point of the whole thing: D-I-Y. So no way am I going to employ someone to do something I can do myself. The point of the original post was to ask if anyone had seen this type of tool I thought to be useful. No?... OK...just say so or STFU!
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On 9/1/2011 12:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

Oh, STFU yourself. I paid $300 for two drilled holes through a 12" section of poured basement wall, for my furnace guy to run ducts through to the addition here. There are specialist subs out there who do this sort of thing routinely. But go ahead and bang your head against the wall, and spend hours doing what the proper tool would do in minutes.
--
aem sends...

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It is more fun to watch a hole being cored in a floor, like for a floor outlet box of some kind...
Some contractors will fill a garbage can with water to catch the plug...
It used to run about $500 per hole, $300 for the hole itself and $200 for the box installed and properly firestopped...
Was cool to watch the big splash when the plug fell through the hole...
~~ Evan
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Too big and not long enough.
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On Aug 30, 10:24pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

I doubt it would work for concrete. I once used a caulking gun tube witht he snout cut off to a big hole size for a similar job placing Water Putty to seal cracls in block walls.
Harry K
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Yeah, that might be the killer for the whole idea. Certainly the 1/2 inch is too small but just pushing it manually with a dowel (no cylinder) does work so at some point above 1/2" it could be useful. BTW it's mortar not concrete. The gravel in the concrete would kill the idea immediately.
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Good idea, That's the sort of thing but in looking at the first couple of dozen Google hits they seem to be only for liquid. No one mentions mortar or anything similar. Further, did you look at the cost? Especially the pneumatic ones. That overpaid contractor is cheap in comparison.

Not necessary.
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Evidently the manufacturer thought about that because the ones I did 20 or so years ago show no corrosion.
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On Sep 2, 7:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:
<snip>
I can't recall (and I'm not going to go looking for it) if anyone suggested the 'foam in a can'? What your are doing is not a 'structural' strength problem so foam should work. IIRC (been a long time) they do come with a plastic straw dthat reaches into a recess. That stuff will for sure both seal the gaps and glue the fan in.
Harry K
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Yes they have. The "straw" is far too short but more importantly I doubt the life of foam is anywhere close to that of mortar. It's like comparing a vinyl- or wood-clad house with a stone of brick one.
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