Ceiling Fan

I recently had to replace the three speed switch on my Gulf Coast Ceiling Fan. Being the bright light that I am, I forgot to mark the wires... So I guessed when I rewired it. Doing that, I got one speed-medium, and three settings of off. So, I took apart another fan that we have in the house that is the same model, made all the wire colors match .. and now have three setting os off, and one of fast. The reason I replaced the switch was breaking the pull chain... the fan worked great on all three speeds, forward and reverse before I replaced the switch. Does anyone have any ideas what I can do to make it work right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For future reference, a digital camera really comes in handy for these types of things. Taking a couple of pictures can be way easier and better than actually marking stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have read that the fan speed switchs in ceiling fans vary quite a bit in how the 4 settings of the switch connect the four terminals on the switch. So if you have matched the wiring diagram for an identical, working fan of the same model, perhaps your replacement switch is not the same switch and has a different connectivity pattern? I believe that there are identical looking switches with different connectivity patterns.
A laborious but definitive process to figure this out would be to first carefully document the wiring of the working fan, then remove the switch, noting what setting it was on. Assuming there are 4 terminals on the switch, use a multimeter to check each of the six pairs of terminals to find out if they are connected electrically, and record the results. Now repeat this three more times, cycling through the switch settings. This information completely characterizes the switch, and you can check your replacement switch to see if it is the same.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SomeGuy wrote:

Search Google for the part number of the switch (and maybe the manufacturer's name). Odds are good that you'll find the wiring diagram on-line. Worst case, visit a dealer who sells that model, and ask to copy the diagram.
You might be able to wire the switch to a window fan and experiment until you figure it out (assuming it's a 110 volt switch). Just set the fan on high (to bypass its own multi-speed switch).
Randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just reading the post, its sounding like the problem is not so much with the switch as it is with the wires going from the switch to the fan. If im not mistaken (and I could be) the fan itself has wires that go to the switch and the electricity goes through the switch to the various other terminals on the switch. If that is the case, then you need to know which wires to hook to which terminals. That being the case, trying to find the switch manufacturer wont help. Using an ohm meter would help you determine which terminal is live at any switch setting. Remembering that the fastest rpm is what is supposed to turn on first of course. Not sure I was any help, but hey, you get what you pay for on here right? :) B
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.