Cauk/Filler for Expansion joint

Folks,
I am looking to fill the expansion joint between my slab of my basement, and the outside walls. A little history:
We had a bit of water in the basement - came up through the expansion joint at one edge of the basement. Sure enough, there was negative drainage allowing snow-dammed water to leak into the house.
I have repaired that issue (put a french drain in) but I'd like to take an extra precaution while I have everything ripped out of my basement. I understand that filling this gap is not going to solve any leaking problems that I might have...i'm just looking to cover all bases.
Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can use to fill the joint? It would need to be:
a.) water proof b.) expandable/contractable/flexible with the movement of the slab. c.) resiliant to the tests of time. (it should last a long time.)
- Thanks in advance,
Todd
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On Thu, 31 May 2007 07:17:13 -0700, Todd wrote:

Silicone rubber fits your criteria.
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Can you recommend a brand of silicone rubber that would work for me?
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On Thu, 31 May 2007 08:25:25 -0700, Todd wrote:

Dow Corning, DAP, even hardware store brands like True Value. If it's going to be damp you can get a mold and mildew formula. I steer clear of GE because it caused me grief when I caulked in a shower surround and the stuff didn't cure even after 4 days. Man what a mess that was to remove and re-prep.
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All these products would work, but I would include GE 100% pure silicone adhesive and sealer. It is unpaintable, but tougher than all the paintable types. Only trouble I've had with GE is when i use it beyond the "good until" date printed on the bottom of the cartridge - then it indeed will not set properly. Make sure whatever brand you use, that it is fresh (date will be printed somewhere) Roger
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DAMHIKT, but you will not be able to influence water infiltration by sealing this joint. What WILL work is to keep the water-table below the level of the floor. What you're up to is purely cosmetic- go for the prettiest color silicone.
J
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As others have said, it won't prevent water entry, but I'd go with 50 year urethane caulk. I found it sticks way better than silicone and outlasts it too. Any type of caulk, silicon or urethane works best if it only attaches to two surfaces, so it can easily stretch with movement. So first stuff a piece of foam backer rod (you can get at borg) in, and then caulk. The backer rod flexes, so it allows the bottom of the caulk bead to stretch. You don't want more than about 1/4-3/8" thick bead of caulk. And if the gap is wider than about 3/8-1/2" you need a different solution.
HTH,
Paul
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"As others have said, it won't prevent water entry, but I'd go with 50 year urethane caulk. I found it sticks way better than silicone and outlasts it too. Any type of caulk, silicon or urethane works best if it only attaches to two surfaces, so it can easily stretch with movement. So first stuff a piece of foam backer rod (you can get at borg) in, and then caulk. The backer rod flexes, so it allows the bottom of the caulk bead to stretch. You don't want more than about 1/4-3/8" thick bead of caulk. And if the gap is wider than about 3/8-1/2" you need a different solution. HTH, Paul"
I second the polyurethane caulk recommendation. In my experience it is very tough, and maybe better than pure silicone caulk, in this case. Roger
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| Folks, | | I am looking to fill the expansion joint between my slab of my | basement, and the outside walls. A little history: | | We had a bit of water in the basement - came up through the expansion | joint at one edge of the basement. Sure enough, there was negative | drainage allowing snow-dammed water to leak into the house. | | I have repaired that issue (put a french drain in) but I'd like to | take an extra precaution while I have everything ripped out of my | basement. I understand that filling this gap is not going to solve | any leaking problems that I might have...i'm just looking to cover all | bases. | | Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can use to fill the | joint? It would need to be: | | | a.) water proof | b.) expandable/contractable/flexible with the movement of the slab. | c.) resiliant to the tests of time. (it should last a long time.) | | | - Thanks in advance, | | Todd |
Expansion joints are the most common type of moving cracks. They allow sections of your concrete floor to freely "expand" and "contract" in response to temperature changes in the surface. These cracks are your floors weakest spots and when combined with moderate to heavy traffic you have a potential for constant damage. To fill these joints a material is needed that will flex to accommodate movement. Tigerthane 220(TM) from Garon Products will provide you with a durable flexible seal that will not become brittle and break out with movement. Tigerthane 220(TM) is ideal for repairing spalled joints, as well as filling random cracks and patching gouges, holes and surface defects. Tigerthane 220(TM) is a rapid setting, 100% solids, flexible, two-part polyurea elastomer. Tigerthane 220(TM) is designed to set in applications ranging from freezing conditions to 130F and will be traffic ready within 60 minutes. Most importantly, Tigerthane 220(TM) is not brittle like ordinary concrete repair materials allowing it to move with the floor. The use of Tigerthane 220(TM) prevents contaminants from pooling in joint areas-especially necessary in food plants and other floor surfaces where sanitary conditions are required.
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