Can welding Oxygen be used in place of medical oxygen?

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On 6/18/2010 8:58 PM, Some Guy wrote:

it's the same.
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Steve Barker
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who actually know the difference.
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On 6/19/2010 8:01 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

i read the responses. It's the same.
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wrote:

It *can* be the same. However, oxygen graded for welding, but not for medical use, isn't safe for medical use.
Wether or not a store sells medical grade oxygen to welders is up to the store and not universally true.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

the people who said they're different said it a long time ago when they actually were different. Times have changed,they no longer actually are different.
did you not read the article cited? it was very informative.
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Uh-huh. Right. Welding oxygen is certified just as pure as medical oxygen, no contaminants. Suuuurrrrre it is. That's why they use welding oxygen in hospitals.
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On 6/19/2010 10:02 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

There is a LOT of shit done in hospitals simply because that is the way they've always done it. To suggest otherwise to them will get you a look that suggests you've lost your mind.
I deal with policies all the time that closer examination would reveal are outdated and kind of stupid if you consider the current realities. But the Powers That Be know what they know and nobody can tell them different. So we still do what we've always done.... because we've always done it that way.
A lawyer would probably make a big deal about "welding" oxygen instead of USP in much the same way the US Navy made a big deal about the captain of the USS Indianapolis not zigzaging when his ship was torpedoed. The commander of the Japanese submarine testified at his court martial that it wouldn't have mattered one way or the other; he still would have nailed him. The Navy didn't care... because policy stated you should always zigzag when submarines might be around. After all, they'd always done it that way.
Many of the folks who determine these policies are dinosaurs, and about as current.
Jay
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Doug Miller wrote:

As has been noted many times already, the welding grade purity standard is higher than that for the medical grade. People who do not know anything about welding think it's some low standards dirty process, but that is simply not the reality. Impurities in O2 that are harmless for human use, will cause welds to fail inspections.
Welding O2 standard 99.99% pure O2 Medical O2 standard 99.95% pure O2
The reality is that the actual product in the cylinders is closer to 99.999% pure, the analytical grade standard.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Yes, it's the same. Anything to the contrary is "urban legend" or hype for the purpose of charging more for the same stuff. All the O2 grades, including the five nines analytical grade are filled from the same cryo tanks, and only the analytical grade gets any extra testing to ensure the 99.999% spec. The reality is that the welding O2 purity standard (99.99%) is higher than the medical O2 purity standard (99.95%), and that the actual product from the gas suppliers exceeds those purity standards by a wide margin.
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In wrote:

Amazing: All those posts, guesses and "sound good" types mostly, for a question that's so easily answered with a search engine that it's actually pathetic. This is precsely why groups like this have such low crediblity and high drift rates.
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wrote:

no it isn't
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On Saturday, June 19, 2010 at 6:25:46 AM UTC-7, AZ Nomad wrote:
om> wrote:

look the same on the outside but are markered different. Medical oxygen tan ks are held to a higher standard than industrial oxygen. Medical tanks are "Oxygen clean" whereas welding tanks may not be as clean. Medical oxygen is also dryer to prevent rust in the tanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Bullshit . That medical O2 comes out of the very same tanks as welding O2 . And in some cases welding oxy is held to a higher standard of purity . And any impurities in the tanks can cause the same problems , no matter the intended end use . CHECK THE DATE ON THAT POST , you're responding to stuff from 5 years ago .
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+1

That's what you get from a google grouper. Still an interesting question that I have never seen.
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The main difference is that Insurance won't pay for it out of the other tanks. The other thing is that I don't know if the regulators are similar enough to regulate how much O2 you get and if they are compatible with the tubing for delivery.
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 18:32:38 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have friends who recharge their high altitude flight oxygen bottles from their welding oxygen tanks.
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 22:19:29 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It seems to me all this depends on what the intended concentration is in the first place. If one is 100% O2, or 98% and the other is 92%, they're both still way higher than air. As long as the other 2% or 8% isn't poisonous, if it's nitirogen with a little helium and a trace of argon and a bit of xenon, it's going to work for breathing for sure, and I would think it would work great for a torch. As long as their both high, it doesnt' seem to matter which has a higher standard.
Though I think AZ may be right and there shouldn't be too much water in the tank or your lungs may rust.
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wrote:

I have never seen oxygen at a welding store that wasn't medical rated on the label. Perhaps if you are just swapping a little prestolite tank it might not be but the 80s and larger I see have the medical label on them.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Medical/aviator 99.95% purity Welding 99.99% purity Analytical 99.999% purity
All filled from the same liquid oxygen supply, only the analytical grade gets extra attention.
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